September 20

Delta Plane Bound for Fort Lauderdale Suddenly Plunges 30-thousand Feet

first_imgPassengers described panic when the plane’s altitude began plunging and the oxygen masks came down. Quick video taken by a passenger aboard @Delta flight 2353. It was heading to Ft. Lauderdale from Atlanta. They had to make an emergency landing at @FlyTPA. At 5:45 on @abcactionnews I’ll have the details on the scary situation. pic.twitter.com/zhmn0767pV— Jasmine Styles (@JasmineStylesTV) September 19, 2019 No one was hurt. A spokesperson for Delta says the plane experienced a problem with its cabin pressure, forcing the pilots to drop quickly to a safer altitude.It is not clear what caused the cabin to lose pressure.This harrowing story comes on the heels of a judge is denying an American Airlines mechanic with possible ISIS ties bond for allegedly trying to sabotage a commercial airliner out of Miami. Ahmed Alani is being charged with “willfully damaging, destroying, disabling, or wrecking an aircraft.” He was arrested back in July for trying to damage an aircraft’s data system that reports the speed and pitch of the plane. Prosecutors say Alani had downloaded ISIS videos on his phone and had traveled to Iraq earlier this year.And this Delta airplane made an emergency landing earlier this morning according to this passenger.Bila ko tengah flying tetiba tengok enjin kapal terbang cam ni..pucat tak pucat? This happened on Delta’s flight 1425 from Atlanta to Baltimore. The aircraft made an emergency landing in Raleigh. pic.twitter.com/mKJjmop4iP— Malay Guy (@MatMalay) September 19, 2019 Passengers on a Delta flight from Atlanta to Fort Lauderdale are glad to be safely back on the ground after their plane plummeted about 30-thousand feet in less than seven minutes and was diverted to Tampa for an emergency landing. Delta flight makes emergency landing in Tampa after cabin pressurization issue. https://t.co/eNhmLoIQs6 pic.twitter.com/rnJ5hVEq2o— Breaking Aviation News (@breakingavnews) September 19, 2019last_img read more

September 16

Syracuse sweeps ACC Player of the Week honors

first_img Published on March 26, 2018 at 4:25 pm Contact Matt: mdliberm@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+ No. 10 Syracuse (4-3, 2-0 Atlantic Coast) swept Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Week honors.Brendan Bomberry earned offensive player of the week after scoring four goals against then-No. 3 Duke on Saturday. Two of those goals came within the final five minutes, as SU staged a comeback win down in Durham.Nick Mellen earned defense honors after holding the nation’s top scorer, Justin Guterding, to just two points on one goal and one assist. The Duke star had been averaging over six points per game.The honors come after the Orange moved up five spots in the Inside Lacrosse rankings following the 15-14 win.Both players will look to keep it rolling this Saturday when the Orange hosts No. 7 Notre Dame (5-2, 0-0) at the Carrier Dome.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Commentslast_img read more

July 20

Scientists find genetic marker that indicates a persons risk for tachycardiainduced cardiomyopathy

first_imgAug 9 2018Scientists in Japan have found a potential marker to identify which people with abnormally fast heartbeats are at high risk of developing heart failure.The results were published in June in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine, a journal from the American Heart Association.Atrial fibrillation, or chronically, abnormally fast heartbeat, can be a symptom of a potentially fatal disease known as tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC). The condition can be reversed and damage can be prevented, but only if the heartbeat is brought back into proper rhythm through drugs or catheter therapy. TIC is currently only diagnosed after ruling out other potential heart disorders, and little is known about risk factors for TIC, according to study author Yukiko Nakano, an associate professor at the Graduate School of Biomedical & Health Sciences at Hiroshima University.Related StoriesRNA-binding protein SRSF3 appears to be key factor for proper heart contraction, survivalWeightlifting is better for the heart than cardioTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockNow her team has taken a step toward diagnosing and treating the condition more quickly. The researchers identified a genetic marker that indicates when a person with a fast heartbeat is more likely to develop TIC and, eventually, heart failure. Heart disease is the third cause of death in Japan, according to the World Health Organization,”Atrial fibrillation is the most common cause of TIC in patients without a history of structural heart diseases,” Nakano wrote. “Poorly controlled ventricular rates may worsen ventricular function, but only a fraction of patients with atrial fibrillation develop TIC.”Previous studies have identified 26 genetic variants associated with atrial fibrillation. Of these, only two are cardiac ion channel genes, which help regulate the heart’s conduction. The gene HCN4 is the only one that is known to have a critical function in the autonomic control of heart rate, so Nakano and her team investigated how small changes in the gene could indicate a greater risk for developing heart failure in a study of 73 patients. The genetically different HCN4 marks which patients are at increased risk for heart failure.While the researchers plan to further validate their results with a larger study cohort, they’re hopeful that they’re on the right track to help people at risk for cardiac damage or even death.”We will be able to distinguish the high-risk atrial fibrillation patients developing heart failure and consider [them] for early therapeutic intervention,” Nakano said. “We can prevent their heart failure by stricter heart rate control or early rhythm control [using currently available heart devices and drugs].”Nakano also said that this genetic marker could potentially serve as a therapeutic target for the development of a drug to help patients with atrial fibrillation maintain or restore a healthy heart rhythm. Source:https://www.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/last_img read more