October 6

A standard project home has been tweaked with a touch of Hamptons-style

first_img32 Riverbreeze Crescent, Maudsland.The hallway opens up to reveal an open-plan formal lounge room with gas fire place, Calacutta marble bench tops in the kitchen and dark oak timber floors. 32 Riverbreeze Crescent, Maudsland.“This wasn’t an ordinary design for Metricon and they hadn’t done anything like this in Queensland yet so we didn’t really know how it would turn out,” Mr Russell said.“There were a few similar designs in Melbourne so we flew there for a weekend to walk through a few of the homes there to get a better feel of what it would look like completed.“It is stylish to say the least,” he said. 32 Riverbreeze Crescent, Maudsland.“We looked at this home as a design adventure and made a lot of alternations, especially with the kitchen.“We wanted a hotel flair in the bedrooms so we chose more bold colours and features.”Aegean honed limestone on the floors and a Arabescato marble vanity top combine with a freestanding bath in the ensuited main bedroom.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North8 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoMr Kadel said the house was not a typical Metricon designed home with a sweeping Hamptons-style staircase, purple carpeted bedrooms and a custom kitchen. 32 Riverbreeze Crescent, Maudsland.A lion head door knock opens to an impressive view of the foyer which flows down a hallway of bedrooms and a floor-to-ceiling glass garden atrium.“We created the home so it had a bit of green and instead of walking down the hallway and just looking into bedrooms we wanted something interesting to break it up with,” Mrs Kadel said.“Russell and I also work from home so it was very important to have an environment that aide you feel good. 32 Riverbreeze Crescent, Maudsland. FEAST your eyes upon endless style in this Hamptons-inspired home.By using the bones of a Metricon Home and taking out everything in between, Homeowners Bernii and Russell Kadel decided to be different by adding their own touches to a standard design. 32 Riverbreeze Crescent, Maudsland.“The design was originally a project home which was a good starting point but we ended up changing it quite a bit,” Mrs Kadel said.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:55Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:55 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels576p576p480p480p360p360p240p240pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Finding the Hamptons style03:56 Related videos 03:56Finding the Hamptons style02:45Hamptons Mansion listed for $91 million02:34Showing off your home in the best light02:18Hamptons house bowls over market01:47Holiday in style, for only $US2.5 million02:02Interior design awardsThe Gold Coast couple bought the property almost five years ago and said the design took six months to get onto paper and council approved.“I have always had a passion for interior design, I used to buy a lot of home design magazines and really had an eye for American architecture,” Mrs Kadel said. 32 Riverbreeze Crescent, Maudsland.Georgio Impala marble tiles and a handmade brick feature wall features in the outdoor room and over looks gardens and tree lined parklands. 32 Riverbreeze Crescent, Maudsland.Tinted windows, a crystal chandelier, manicured rose garden and solar system are other standout features in the 540sq m home. 32 Riverbreeze Crescent, Maudsland.“In the afternoons we really enjoy sitting in the outdoor room with a glass of red and watch the birds, Maudsland is an area which is wrapped in wildlife and we have been lucky enough to see 26 bird species from our backyard.”last_img read more

December 30

LAUSD plans new tactics to cut still-dismal dropout rate

first_imgBy Naush Boghossian STAFF WRITER More than a year after rolling out a $10million effort to keep at-risk students in school and to re-enroll those who have left, Los Angeles Unified’s dropout rate has seen little improvement. But the nation’s second-largest school district announced Monday it will expand its anti-dropout efforts to the Internet and radio airwaves and send even more counselors door to door. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas CityThe new program – “My Future, My Decision” – is a broad effort that includes spots on 105.9 FM, a text-messaging campaign and interaction through popular social networking Web sites MySpace and Facebook. While district officials said they are still waiting for full-year dropout data to be released, the most recent numbers – which include two months under the anti-dropout campaign – show a dropout rate of 25.5 percent or about 1.4 percentage points higher than the year before. “We’re getting a lot of good information from principals and local district superintendents so I would expect to see the (dropout) numbers come down,” said Debra Duardo, LAUSD’s director of dropout prevention and recovery. “We don’t have the statistics for this year to measure how successful it’s been. ? We’ll see in a couple of months ? the impact of their work.” Duardo said the dropout rate increased in the most recent measures because it was the first year in which the state’s Exit Exam was a requirement for graduation, so 12th-grade performance brought down the total average. The ninth, 10th and 11th grades all experienced significant improvements in the dropout rate, but 12th-graders had 52 percent more dropouts compared with the year before. District officials on Monday said they did not know how much the new efforts would cost but said it would come out of the $10 million already allocated to the program. When LAUSD rolled out its Diploma Project in August 2006, the goal was to track about 20,000 at-risk students – even so far as going to their homes to get acquainted with the kids and their parents. This year, district officials said they were able to reduce that to about 17,000 students. Counselor Rochelle Morrison, who works out of Gardena High School, has been visiting students at home since the fall of 2006. “It’s a different approach,” Morrison said about the new campaign. “It could be a way to reach kids. It’s going to help us reach them, but we’re still going to have to do our best to bring them back.” Ultimately, district officials hope to reduce LAUSD’s dropout rate every year. The target for this year is a 5 percent reduction. District dropout rates have been estimated at anywhere from 23percent to more than 50 percent. Under the program, LAUSD has 80 diploma project advisers at 45 high schools and 34 middle schools to work with teachers and at-risk students to determine how to keep them in school – including through independent study, adult education classes or off-campus learning centers. “The message is come back. Come back to school,” Superintendent David Brewer said. “Do not stay out there and become a statistic in our society.” At Watts’ Jordan High School, where the district held the news conference Monday morning, there were about 20 students the dropout counselor was able to bring back to school. Rene Ahal, a diploma project adviser at Reseda High School, said the biggest challenge is that most at-risk students are so far behind in credits by the time they reach high school that they feel helpless. But Ahal said most also don’t know about the options available to them – including making up credits at community college or adult school. And Ahal said she also talks to them about how much money they can make and what kinds of jobs they can aspire to with high-school diplomas. “We expect to see changes, but the program’s only been in effect for the past year,” Ahal said. “Over time it’s going to make a big difference.” Saul Hernandez, 19, said that although he had trouble with drugs in the ninth and 10th grades, he realized he needed to graduate from high school to have a better future. Now, he said he hopes to tell his story through the Internet to help others who aren’t sure if they want to get a high school diploma. “I knew that if I wasn’t going to get a good education, I wasn’t going to make it in life,” said Hernandez, a father-to-be who expects to graduate from high school in June. “It could make a change for other students. They can see us as an example to not be a dropout.” naush.boghossian@dailynews.com Staff writer Paul Clinton contributed to this article.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more