December 31

Draft law would begin German hard coal phaseout in 2020

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Platts:Germany plans to close 4 GW of hard coal-fired plants via a first annual compensation auction in June 2020, an energy ministry spokeswoman told S&P Global Platts Tuesday.Compensation for closures is to be awarded to bidders offering the lowest cost of avoided CO2 emissions with winning plants set to close after winter 2020/21. The federal grid regulator BNetzA is set to run the auctions, according to a second draft leaked Tuesday.The ministry is finalizing a hard coal exit law to cap hard coal capacity at 15 GW by end-2022. Assuming Datteln 4 comes online, Germany will have around 22 GW of hard coal capacity in operation as the compensation auctions get underway.The BNetzA is to establish exact volumes required to hit the 15 GW target depending on other closure applications, the outcome of various capacity reserve auctions and startup of Uniper’s 1.1 GW Datteln 4 plant. Commissioning of Datteln 4 is foreseen for summer 2020.Closure auctions thereafter are set to run annually until 2026, with hard coal capacity declining to 8 GW by end-2030.Details on 3 GW of lignite closures are expected at a later stage, with Eur40 billion ($44 billion) of support for lignite mining regions already approved. Germany plans to completely phase out coal by 2038.More: Germany plans 4 GW hard coal closure auction in 2020: draft law Draft law would begin German hard coal phaseout in 2020last_img read more

December 20

Summit in Colombia Focuses on Global Drug Trafficking Fight

first_imgClose cooperation between Colombia and the U.S. is strengthening the fight against international drug trafficking and other illegal enterprises. “To this we have had to strengthen the capacities of all our forces — intelligence, air mobility, special operations, and especially our credibility,” Pinzón said. The conference was an excellent opportunity for Military and police officials from Central and South America to gather and exchange ideas on how nations in the region can work together to combat international drug trafficking and other transnational criminal enterprises that the region shares. In line with the theme of this year’s IDEC, “Transformation of the Drug Phenomenon: A Global Challenge,” Pinzón laid out the increasing need for international cooperation in the fight against narcotrafficking and other criminal enterprises. Though it isn’t as prevalent today as it was in 2000, authorities must remain vigilant in their battle against the “curse” of international narcotrafficking. The close ties between the two countries was underscored during the conference, when Colombian government authorities held a ceremony to highlight the donation by U.S. officials of six high-speed interceptor boats from Safe Boats International to strengthen the Colombian National Navy’s interdiction efforts along the Colombian Pacific coastline. Illicit trafficking as efficient as FedEx Colombia receives high speed boats from the U.S. In line with the theme of this year’s IDEC, “Transformation of the Drug Phenomenon: A Global Challenge,” Pinzón laid out the increasing need for international cooperation in the fight against narcotrafficking and other criminal enterprises. Though it isn’t as prevalent today as it was in 2000, authorities must remain vigilant in their battle against the “curse” of international narcotrafficking. The event included officials from the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and the United Nations (UN). The -three-day conference, which was organized by the Colombian National Police, began June 2 with remarks by Colombian Chief of Police General Rodolfo Palomino. Illicit trafficking as efficient as FedEx In another cooperative security agreement, the Navies of Colombia, Brazil, and Peru are working together in BRACOLPER Naval 2015, a Military operation to combat transnational criminal activities in the Amazon region shared by the three countries. The event included officials from the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and the United Nations (UN). The -three-day conference, which was organized by the Colombian National Police, began June 2 with remarks by Colombian Chief of Police General Rodolfo Palomino. “What we need, more than a war, is a complete package of intelligent, well-designed, well-executed, people-centered measures,” said Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos. He has assigned outgoing Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón with developing a new strategy to combat drug trafficking in different and more efficient ways. “Colombia has made great progress precisely because we have faced the threats posed by drug trafficking and related crime head on,” Pinzón said. In May, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said he was reassigning Pinzón to the post of ambassador in Washington, D.C., and that current ambassador to the U.S. Luis Carlos Villegas is replacing Pinzón as defense minister. “What we need, more than a war, is a complete package of intelligent, well-designed, well-executed, people-centered measures,” said Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos. He has assigned outgoing Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón with developing a new strategy to combat drug trafficking in different and more efficient ways. This means that Military and law enforcement authorities must attack every link in the chain of the illegal drug trade, from the cultivation and production of illegal drugs to money laundering, drug trafficking, and related crimes. “These boats are additional resources to defeat crime and drug trafficking in Colombia, which is our main goal together with our ally, the United States,” Pinzón said. “The boats that we received today give us an increased capacity to remove tons of cocaine from drug traffickers,” he added. The vessels will be used to intercept vessels suspected of trafficking narcotics, weapons, and other illicit items. This means that Military and law enforcement authorities must attack every link in the chain of the illegal drug trade, from the cultivation and production of illegal drugs to money laundering, drug trafficking, and related crimes. The close ties between the two countries was underscored during the conference, when Colombian government authorities held a ceremony to highlight the donation by U.S. officials of six high-speed interceptor boats from Safe Boats International to strengthen the Colombian National Navy’s interdiction efforts along the Colombian Pacific coastline. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) is one of the main criminal groups which engages in narcotrafficking. The FARC uses proceeds from drug trafficking to finance its terrorist attacks against the civilian population, the Military, and police forces. The U.S. government and its Armed Forces work hand-in-hand with Colombia to fight drug trafficking, terrorism, weapons smuggling, human trafficking and other transnational criminal enterprises. “We rely heavily on our international partners [across the region],” Gen. Kelly said. “Illicit trafficking threatens every single one of our countries, using a vast system of pathways to move hundreds of tons of drugs, tens of thousands of people, and countless weapons into and out of the United States, Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia,” said General John F. Kelly, commander of USSOUTHCOM. “And they do so with an efficiency, payload, and gross profit that FedEx would envy.” By Dialogo June 16, 2015 The nature of international drug trafficking has changed, Gen. Kelly said. “Illicit trafficking threatens every single one of our countries, using a vast system of pathways to move hundreds of tons of drugs, tens of thousands of people, and countless weapons into and out of the United States, Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia,” said General John F. Kelly, commander of USSOUTHCOM. “And they do so with an efficiency, payload, and gross profit that FedEx would envy.” From cocaine cowboys to drug corporations “To this we have had to strengthen the capacities of all our forces — intelligence, air mobility, special operations, and especially our credibility,” Pinzón said. “Gone are the days of the ‘cocaine cowboys’ — we’re now dealing with ‘cocaine corporations’ who have franchises all over the world,” the SOUTHCOM commander said. The U.S. government and its Armed Forces work hand-in-hand with Colombia to fight drug trafficking, terrorism, weapons smuggling, human trafficking and other transnational criminal enterprises. “We rely heavily on our international partners [across the region],” Gen. Kelly said. From cocaine cowboys to drug corporations The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) is one of the main criminal groups which engages in narcotrafficking. The FARC uses proceeds from drug trafficking to finance its terrorist attacks against the civilian population, the Military, and police forces. “Gone are the days of the ‘cocaine cowboys’ — we’re now dealing with ‘cocaine corporations’ who have franchises all over the world,” the SOUTHCOM commander said. Cartagena, Colombia hosted the 32nd International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC) in June, with close to 400 representatives from more than 120 countries working together to find new ways to fight and dismantle transnational criminal organizations and terrorist groups. Colombia receives high speed boats from the U.S. Cartagena, Colombia hosted the 32nd International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC) in June, with close to 400 representatives from more than 120 countries working together to find new ways to fight and dismantle transnational criminal organizations and terrorist groups. The nature of international drug trafficking has changed, Gen. Kelly said. Close cooperation between Colombia and the U.S. is strengthening the fight against international drug trafficking and other illegal enterprises. “Colombia has made great progress precisely because we have faced the threats posed by drug trafficking and related crime head on,” Pinzón said. In May, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said he was reassigning Pinzón to the post of ambassador in Washington, D.C., and that current ambassador to the U.S. Luis Carlos Villegas is replacing Pinzón as defense minister. “These boats are additional resources to defeat crime and drug trafficking in Colombia, which is our main goal together with our ally, the United States,” Pinzón said. “The boats that we received today give us an increased capacity to remove tons of cocaine from drug traffickers,” he added. The vessels will be used to intercept vessels suspected of trafficking narcotics, weapons, and other illicit items. The conference was an excellent opportunity for Military and police officials from Central and South America to gather and exchange ideas on how nations in the region can work together to combat international drug trafficking and other transnational criminal enterprises that the region shares. In another cooperative security agreement, the Navies of Colombia, Brazil, and Peru are working together in BRACOLPER Naval 2015, a Military operation to combat transnational criminal activities in the Amazon region shared by the three countries. it’s good…. CONGRATULATIONS TO CLAUDIA GURISATI, FOR BRINGING SANTOS TO JUDGMENT, THAT’S HOW JOURNALISM IS DONE.SHE IS A PROGRAM DIRECTORlast_img read more