May 3

Sub-fusc tour auction

first_imgAn enterprising Oxford graduate has attempted to sell a special tour of Oxford online. The person set up an online listing on eBay, and advertised a “Day in the Life of an Oxford student”, showing the self-named “auctionwilliam”, clad in sub-fusc. He promised afternoon tea at the Grand Café, punting and even access to lectures and “exclusive parts of Colleges”. He recommended his services as being “ideal for foreigners”. Nobody hasARCHIVE: 1st week TT 2004last_img

August 12

Dr. Fauci: Florida Jumped “Over a Couple of Checkpoints” in Reopening

first_imgAs Florida crossed the 4,000-death threshold for the coronavirus pandemic and logged the most deaths in a 24-hour period on Thursday, the state became the focus of criticism from the nation’s top infectious disease expert.Dr. Anthony Fauci, who heads the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, called out Florida for bypassing guidelines and opening too soon.“Certainly Florida jumped over a couple of checkpoints,” he said in an interview with FiveThirtyEight.Fauci also told the Wall Street Journal that states that are experiencing spikes in cases and deaths, including Florida, should again consider lockdowns.“I think any state that is having a serious problem, that state should seriously look at shutting down,” he said. The state’s one-day death toll high is a likely sign of a rise in coronavirus deaths in the days ahead, according to Dr. Jay Wolfson, Professor of Public Health, Medicine and Pharmacy at the University of South Florida. “It’s going to get worse,” he said.Dr. Wolfson adds that the rise in deaths typically comes last, weeks after the initial spike in cases occurs. “It’s a cascade,” Wolfson said, “and we are just in the early phases of that cascade.”The state’s Department of Health on Thursday reported 232,718 confirmed cases and 4,009 deaths.In a news conference in Jacksonville on Thursday, Gov. Ron DeSantis said Florida and the rest of the Sun Belt region seems to be experiencing a “natural peak” in new cases.He added that most new cases are in younger populations, who are more likely to avoid serious illness and death.last_img read more

August 12

Superb Great Britain & Ireland win the Curtis Cup

first_img Great Britain and Ireland won the Curtis Cup for the first time since 1996 with a superb singles performance at Nairn Golf Club, Scotland. They beat the USA in five of the eight matches for an overall victory scoreline of 10½-9½. It means the Curtis Cup, the Walker Cup, the Ryder Cup and the Solheim Cup are currently all held on this side of the Atlantic. GB&I were trailing the USA by a point at the start of today’s play, but matters quickly changed. English champion Kelly Tidy came back from three down after six to win the top match and put GB&I on level terms with the USA. Welsh champion Amy Boulden and England’s Holly Clyburn – playing her second Curtis Cup – quickly followed with their wins. GB&I were two points ahead. Next to put her point on the board was England’s world number five, Charley Hull, who romped to a 5/3 win over her opponent and was an estimated three-under par. Meanwhile the Americans had scored two points with wins over Pamela Pretswell of Scotland and Ireland’s Leona Maguire. The state of play was GB&I 9½, USA 8½  – and 10½ points were required for an outright victory.  It fell to Ireland’s Stephanie Meadow to score the point which brought the Curtis Cup back to these shores. She was round in an approximate four-under par, was never behind in her match and birdied the 15th to go dormie three up, before claiming her victory point on the 16th. Meanwhile, England’s Bronte Law had birdied the 15th and, after halving the 16th and 17th, was just one down with one to play. But, with the overall match decided, the hole and the point was conceded to the USA. Singles scores (GB&I names first)    Kelly Tidy beat Austin Ernst 2/1 Amy Boulden beat Emily Tubert 3/1 Holly Clyburn beat Erica Popson 3/2 Pamela Pretswell lost to Lisa McCloskey 4/3 Bronte Law lost to Tiffany Lua 2 down Charley Hull beat Lindy Duncan 5/3 Stephanie Meadow beat Amy Anderson 4/2 Leona Maguire lost to Brooke Pancake 6/5 Picture caption Standing, from left: Holly Clyburn, team manager Anna Hubbard, Charley Hull, Pamela Pretswell, Leona Maguire and Stephanie Meadow Kneeling, from left: Kelly Tidy, captain Tegwen Matthews, Bronte Law and Amy Boulden Full details: www.lgu.org   Curtis Cup match set to tee off 07 June 2012 The 37th Curtis Cup match tees off at 8am tomorrow morning when the first foursomes session gets underway at Nairn Golf Club in Scotland. The line-up includes three England internationals – Kelly Tidy, Holly Clyburn and Bronte Law – but omits world number five, Charley Hull. The other player to sit out the first session is Scotland’s Pamela Pretswell. The order of play is: 0800 Kelly Tidy & Amy Boulden v Austin Ernst & Brooke Pancake 0812 Holly Clyburn & Bronte Law v Amy Anderson & Tiffany Lua 0824 Leona Maguire & Stephanie Meadow  v Lindy Duncan & Lisa McCloskey The GB&I team are aiming to win the cup for the first time since 1996. And their captain, Tegwen Matthews, makes no secret of her game plan: she wants her players to go on the offensive against the Americans from the first tee in every match. “Over the years, GB&I teams have been very good at fighting back after letting the Americans get too far in front of us to be caught, “ she said. “This time I want it to be the Americans who are playing catch-up golf. I am hammering home to our girls that they have got to start fast, win holes and put the pressure on their opponents.” If the GB&I team do succeed in their mission, the Curtis Cup will join three other major matchplay trophies which are already held on this side of the Atlantic: the Ryder Cup, the Solheim Cup and the Walker Cup. The full GB&I team is: Amy Boulden (Conwy, Wales) 18, Holly Clyburn (Woodhall Spa) 21, Charley Hull (Woburn) 16, Bronte Law (Bramhall) 17, Leona Maguire (Slieve Russell, Ireland) 17, Pamela Pretswell (Bothwell Castle, Scotland) 22, Kelly Tidy (Royal Birkdale) 20, Stephanie Meadow (Royal Portrush, Ireland) 20. This is Holly Clyburn’s second Curtis Cup and she commented: “Hopefully we will win the trophy. I honestly think we can. Everyone is in good form and on the leaderboard all the time. It’s exciting and I’m really looking forward to it.” Full details and scoring: www.lgu.org Caption details: Back row (l-r) Kelly Tidy, Charley Hull, Pamela Pretswell, team captain Tegwen Matthews, Holly Clyburn, Amy Boulden. Front row (l-r) Leona Maguire, Bronte Law, Stephanie Meadow. 7 Jun 2012 Superb Great Britain & Ireland win the Curtis Cup center_img GB&I in great Curtis Cup fightback 09 June 2012 Great Britain and Ireland staged a fantastic fightback in the Curtis Cup match at Nairn Golf Club in Scotland – taking 2½ points from this afternoon’s three fourballs and cutting the USA lead to just one point. The England pairing of Holly Clyburn and Kelly Tidy won one up; England’s Bronte Law and Ireland’s Leona Maguire halved their match; and Scotland’s Pamela Pretswell paired up with Ireland’s Stephanie Meadow for a 2 up victory. The scoreline now stands 6½-5½ in favour of the USA – with the outcome of the match hanging on tomorrow’s eight singles. GB&I are seeking their first win since 1996, while the Americans need 10 points to retain the cup and 10½ for an outright victory. The GB&I performance was crucial after they had managed to win only one of the three morning foursomes and at lunch they were trailing 6-3. But the fightback began straight away. Clyburn and Tidy started birdie, birdie to go one up, but were pulled back to all square by an American birdie on the seventh. On the back nine the wind dropped – and the birdies came to the fore: GB&I birdied the 10th to go one up, but lost the 13th to a birdie. They dropped behind for the first time in the match after they failed to par the short 14th, but had the perfect answer with birdies on 15 and 16 to go ahead again.  Two halves gave them their point. Teenagers Law and Maguire won the first hole and were never behind in their match. Twice they extended the advantage to two holes but the Americans pulled them back and the match was all square after 13 holes – the first time they’d been on level terms since the fourth. The battle continued over the five closing holes, each halved as all four players demonstrated steely nerves. Another precious half point for GB&I. Meadow and Pretswell were down just once in their match, after the USA won the third, but they won the fifth and sixth with birdies to go one up and still held that advantage at the turn. They lost the lead with a bogey on the 10th, regained it on the 13th,  lost it again on the short 14th,  but crucially regained it on the 17th where Pretswell played a superb three-quarter nine-iron to within 3ft of the pin to set up a birdie. The finished two up after the USA failed to hole vital putts on the last green and were three-under par for a five-hour round. The second day’s play attracted nearly 3000 spectators. Fourball results (GB&I first) Holly Clyburn & Kelly Tidy beat Emily Tubert & Amy Anderson 1 up Leona Maguire & Bronte Law halved with Brooke Pancake & Austin Ernst Stephanie Meadow & Pamela Pretswell beat Tiffany Lua & Erica Popson 2up Singles draw (GB&I first) 10:00 Kelly Tidy v Austin Ernst 10:10 Amy Boulden v Emily Tubert 10:20 Holly Clyburn v Erica Popson 10:30 Pamela Pretswell v Lisa McCloskey 10:40 Bronte Law v Tiffany Lua 10:50 Charley Hull v Lindy Duncan 11:00 Stephanie Meadow v Amy Anderson 11:10 Leona Maguire v Brooke Pancake   Full details: www.lgu.org     Irish pair win in Curtis Cup foursomes 09 June 2012 Great Britain & Ireland took one point from this morning’s foursomes sessions at the Curtis Cup match at a very wet Nairn Golf Club in Scotland. The USA, who need 10 points to retain the trophy, now hold a 6-3 lead. The GB&I success was recorded by the all-Ireland pair of Leona Maguire and Stephanie Meadow who beat their opponents 3/1. But Charley Hull – England’s world number five – and Scotland’s Pamela Pretswell were beaten 3/2 in the top match, while Holly Clyburn of England and Welsh champion Amy Boulden lost 2 down. Maguire and Meadow had the satisfaction of turning the tables on the pair who beat them in yesterday’s opening foursomes. The Irish combination got off to a very quick start, winning the first hole and getting to three-up after four. They were never behind in their match although their opponents twice narrowed the margin to just one hole. However, wins at the 16th and 17th gave the GB&I pair their point. Hull and Pretswell lost the first two holes to birdies and, although they managed to get back to all square after their own birdies on the fifth and seventh, they were never able to take the lead in the match. The Americans forged ahead again, winning the eighth and ninth with pars, to reach the turn at two up. The GB&I pair pulled one back at the 10th, but they lost the 13th and 15th – to a birdie – to go dormie three down, bowing out when the 16th was halved. Clyburn and Boulden won the first hole but were three down after six – only to battle back by winning the next three holes to reach the turn all square. The GB&I pair also won the 11th to go ahead for the first time, but were immediately pulled back to all square and then lost the 15th to go one down. Again, they came straight back to square matters on the 16th, but the Americans edged ahead with a par on 17 and, after both pairs found the wet rough off the 18th tee, also won the last. The USA captain Pat Cornett broke her right ankle in an incident at the start of yesterday afternoon’s fourballs and was taken to a local hospital for treatment.  Past USA Curtis Cup team member and captain Carol Semple Thompson, served as interim captain for the afternoon’s matches. Pat resumed her duties this morning. Foursomes results (GB&I names first) Pamela Pretswell & Charley Hull lost to Amy Anderson & Tiffany Lua 3/2 Holly Clyburn & Amy Boulden  lost to Austin Ernst & Brooke Pancake 2 down Stephanie Meadow & Leona Maguire beat Lindy Duncan & Lisa McCloskey  3/1 The draw for the afternoon fourballs is: Holly Clyburn & Kelly Tidy v Emily Tubert & Amy Anderson Leona Maguire & Bronte Law v Brooke Pancake & Austin Ernst Stephanie Meadow & Pamela Pretswell v Tiffany Lua & Erica Popson Full details: www.lgu.org   GB&I fight back in Curtis Cup fourballs 09 June 2012 Great Britain and Ireland fought their way back into the Curtis Cup match at Nairn Golf Club in Scotland with two wins from yesterday’s three afternoon fourballs. It narrowed the gap between GB&I and the USA to two points at the end of the first day’s play, with the visitors holding a 4-2 lead. The USA had made a rapid start when they won all three morning foursomes – and they maintained the momentum by winning the top fourball against England’s world number five, Charley Hull, and Scotland’s Pamela Pretswell. The players shared 11 birdies during the 15 holes of the match and the Americans were approximately six-under par, while the GB&I pair were an estimated three-under. But then the American progress was halted by GB&I. The all-England pairing of Kelly Tidy and Holly Clyburn won their match on the 17th, while fellow England international Bronte Law and Welsh champion Amy Boulden defeated their opponents on the 16th. Tidy and Clyburn won the first hole and were ahead for most of their match. They dropped behind after losing the seventh to an eagle three, but got back on level terms when they won the 10th with a par. They moved ahead by winning the 12th and 13th and although they lost the 16th, they came straight back at their opponents to win both the 17th and the match. Law and Boulden had to play catch-up early on when their opponents had four birdies in the first seven holes and held a two up lead. But from then on, the GB&I pair turned the match around and didn’t lose another hole. They won the eighth with a birdie and were all square after the ninth was conceded – and then moved steadily on, winning 10, 13 and 16 to claim their point. Fourball results (GB&I names first) Pamela Pretswell & Charley Hull lost to Amy Anderson & Emily Tubert 4/3 Kelly Tidy & Holly Clyburn beat Brooke Pancake & Erica Popson 2/1 Bronte Law & Amy Boulden beat Lindy Duncan & Lisa McCloskey 3/2 Round three foursomes draw: 0800 Pamela Pretswell & Charley Hull v  Amy Anderson & Tiffany Lua 0812 Holly Clyburn & Amy Boulden v Austin Ernst & Brooke Pancake 0824 Stephanie Meadow & Leona Maguire v Lindy Duncan & Lisa McCloskey Full details: www.lgu.org   USA strike first blow in Curtis Cup 08 June 2012 The USA struck the first blow in the Curtis Cup by winning all three matches in the opening foursomes at Nairn Golf Club in Scotland. It was the exact opposite of the start hoped for by GB&I captain Tegwen Matthews, who had spoken of the need to make the Americans play catch-up golf. She said:  “I’m afraid that wasn’t quite the fast start we wanted. It’s disappointing. There was some good golf played out there but the Americans were just that bit sharper than us on and around the greens. “That’s something I’m going to talk to the girls about at lunchtime. We need to hole a few more putts and if we do that, there’s no reason why we can’t get back into the match. There’s still a long way to go.” The top GB&I pair of English champion Kelly Tidy and Welsh champion Amy Boulden lost by one hole, having held the lead for much of their match. They got off to a quick start when they won the first hole and they were two up after eight and still held that advantage with five to play. However, they lost the 14th to go back to one up; the 16th to go all square and the 17th to drop behind. The all-England pairing of Holly Clyburn and Bronte Law lost the first two holes to birdies and were three down after five. They settled into the match with a long string of halves before winning the 13th and 15th, with a birdie, but bowed out of the game on the 17th. The Americans quickly took the upper hand in the third game, with birdies on the first three holes, and were six up at the turn against Ireland’s Leona Maguire and Stephanie Meadow. The GB&I pair won the 11th and 12th but lost the 14th and the match. England’s world number five Charley Hull and Scotland’s Pamela Pretswell sat out the first session but are in action in this afternoon’s fourballs.The draw: 13.00 Pamela Pretswell and Charley Hull v Amy Anderson and Emily Tubert 13.15 Kelly Tidy and Holly Clyburn v Brooke Pancake and Erica Popson 13.30 Bronte Law and Amy Boulden v Lindy Duncan and Lisa McCloskey Foursomes results (GB&I names first) Kelly Tidy & Amy Boulden lost to Austin Ernst & Brooke Pancake 1 down Holly Clyburn & Bronte Law lost to Amy Anderson & Tiffany Lua 2/1 Leona Maguire & Stephanie Meadow lost to Lindy Duncan & Lisa McCloskey 5/4 Full details: www.lgu.orglast_img read more

August 5

Penrose & Associates Physical Therapy Talks Neck Pain

first_imgFacebook12Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Jennifer Penrose, DPT, OCS, MTC for Penrose & Associates Physical TherapyIf you or a loved one suffer from chronic pain – so bad that you struggle to do simple things like turning your head to look over your shoulder, or sleep at night without pain, then reading this report and attending our free neck pain workshop may be the most important things you do this year. It may unlock the agonizing mystery of your neck pain and show you a way to get back to the life you deserve…A life where you can sleep at night without tossing and turning, hoping to find one position where your neck pain stops.A life where you can read a book before bed… or newspaper on a morning… without the fear of more neck pain.A life where you can wake up in the morning and not suffer from headaches or migraines…A life where you can plan family time with your kids or grandkids, without worrying over if your neck pain will strike!…Basically, a life without chronic or severe neck pain!We are hosting a free neck pain workshop where we will explain neck pain, headaches, how to tell if it is neck pain versus shoulder pain, and give you some tips to use right away.  You will learn some simple stretches and we will measure your posture that evening to see how much forward head posture you have from using all those “smart” devices!  You can even start with a free neck pain tips report before the workshop on March 14th. “7 Quick, Easy Ways To End Neck Pain Without Taking Painkillers… Or Having To Call And See Your PCP!” (Value $28!), reveals the leading remedy for neck pain that is often overlooked by 95% of even good family doctors, and also shows how you can get to the bottom of neck pain quickly and naturally, for FREE, without even needing a referral from your doctor!…Here’s What You’ll Learn Inside This New Report: The 7 urgent coping strategies every neck pain sufferer must never forget when neck pain strikes!The vital warning signs that it’s not just “another headache” or “a bit of neck stiffness”…The 3 things you can do if you’re hoping to avoid neck surgery – worth requesting just for this!1, 2 or 3? Just how many pillows should you sleep with? And what about your mattress… it’s covered in here.The most successful treatment for chronic neck, (and even nerve pain), that doesn’t involve any drugs, seeing a chiropractor regularly or talking to a doctor.At the workshop there will be some simple exercises that will make a significant difference to neck pain before you wake up tomorrow. And even what to do right now… if you suffer from any motion limiting neck pain.Here’s How To Get Your Free report : Request your 100% Free copy to be sent to you, by calling free on 360-456-1444… you can leave a message 24hrs. Or, if you want the report right now, you can visit www.penrosept.com/neck-report and you can download it instantly.If you want to attend our FREE neck pain workshop at Penrose Physical Therapy Thursday March 14 at 6:00 p.m then please RSVP by emailing us at [email protected] or call 360-456-1444.   You will be so glad you did!last_img read more

August 3

More than 90 players turn out for Whitecaps FC Kootenay Academy at Lakeside Pitch

first_imgThe Lakeside soccer pitch was filled with players eager to be part of the Whitecaps FC Kootenay Academy as evaluators looked at girls and boys from 10 to 18 years of age during tryouts Wednesday.More than 90 players attended the second day of the two-day evaluation session headed up by Dave Spendlove of Soccer Quest.The Whitecaps FC Kootenay Academy is an opportunity for youth soccer players from throughout the Kootenays to be part of regional teams in four divisions — U12, U14, U16 and U18 — in girls and boys.The program runs from September to April, with a winter break in December. Teams train eight times during the season at the Soccer Quest facility in Nelson.There are four Showcase tournaments each team will attend.During the season players receive monthly visits from Whitecaps FC staff led by Whitecaps Okanagan Regional Head Coach David Broadhurst; fulltime Soccer Quest staff working with approved Whitecaps FC Academy curriculum; and opportunities to be part of a larger scouting network and greater exposure to college/university and professional opportunities.The Nelson evaluation sessions included players from throughout the West Kootenay.Last week Soccer Quest staff held a camp at Moir Soccer Complex in Cranbrook for East Kootenay players.Soccer Quest coaches will contact successful candidates in the near future.last_img read more

December 25

Bruins clicking with camaraderie

first_img Bruins linebacker Spencer Havner said the new relationship made it easy for him to meet Monday with defensive coordinator Larry Kerr and suggest how to possibly eliminate slow starts, by establishing a higher tempo at the start of practice to simulate a game. But the shape of the relationship between coaches and players began taking shape in the spring, and made it all right for players to ask for one change. Conditioning drills were at 6 a.m., and unsupervised 7-on-7 drills were in the late afternoon. It left many players angry about sitting around campus for two or three hours until the passing drills. Lewis said some players spoke to the coaches about starting conditioning an hour later, and staging passing drills earlier. The coaches agreed, and everyone was happy. “Instead of making us fit their program, it seems like they’ve been doing things to make the program fit us,” Lewis said. “That’s a big difference.” In turn, the players felt they had a bigger investment in the program. “By no means do we tell the coaches what to do, but it’s about working together,” Olson said. “It’s the relationship. We sat Coach Dorrell down and gave him ideas, and he sat us down and gave us his thoughts. It’s sort of a win-win situation if you take it the right way.” Olson has evolved into one of the top quarterbacks in the nation. He has 15 touchdown passes, three interceptions, a 67.2 completion percentage and three consecutive fourth-quarter comebacks. The Bruins seem to be better conditioned, outscoring their opponents 88-17 in the fourth quarter, and have 24 touchdowns and three field goals in 28 red-zone trips. And UCLA’s six wins came against teams with a combined 15-22 record. “I have no idea what kind of team we could be,” Dorrell said. “I’ll tell you this. We could be so much better than we are. I know that, and we have a lot of potential to really improve and possibly be a great team in the end.” UCLA NOTES: The biggest curiosity about Oregon State quarterback Moore’s transfer from UCLA in 2003 was the timing. He left during the season, weeks before the Bruins’ bowl game. “I would expect something like that to happen back then,” Page said. “That’s just the way our team was going back then. There are no hard feelings. It’s just going to be another football game.” … OSU is 95th of 117 Division I-A teams in rushing offense (106.8 yards per game), and UCLA is 114th in rushing defense (229.7). 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “We really feel like it’s a family,” fullback Michael Pitre said. “I think it’s the camaraderie, and how close the team is,” Olson said. “Everybody is so close,” tight end Marcedes Lewis said. After spring Football 101 classes in which players better learned what coaches expected, and coaches better learned what players desired, a close-knit bond formed, and the large gap between coaches and players was bridged. “They talk to us now, and ask us for suggestions on how things should be going (in practice), or what we feel we could do to be better with this and that,” senior strong safety Jarrad Page said. “It’s because we’ve earned their respect and their trust by what we’ve done.” UCLA quarterback Drew Olson rolled to his right and lofted the game-tying touchdown pass to Marcus Everett with 44 seconds remaining in regulation. The first person Olson came in contact with after leading the 17-point comeback was running backs coach Eric Bieniemy, who engulfed Olson in a bear hug. center_img In dissecting how UCLA rose from unranked to No. 8 in the nation, there are plenty of reasons red-zone efficiency, superior conditioning, Olson’s much-improved play, a favorable schedule and a resiliency not seen in Westwood in a long time. But as the Bruins (6-0, 3-0 Pacific-10 Conference) look for their first 7-0 start since 1998, and fourth since 1954, today at the Rose Bowl against Matt Moore-led Oregon State, one factor stands alone. last_img read more

December 20

Photos: 10 images that tell the story of Warriors falling to Clippers in Game 5

first_imgGame 5 didn’t go well for the Golden State Warriors.The Los Angeles Clippers came out with an intensity that the home team didn’t match. That was indicative of the score at halftime with Los Angeles up 71-63. Golden State was able to keep pace with the Clippers in the second half, and they even rallied to tie the game in the fourth quarter.Unfortunately, the Clippers’ Lou Williams made a 4-point play that sealed the win late in the game. The Warriors will unable to complete the comeback.That …last_img read more

December 18

BRICS and Africa in the new world order

first_img11 July 2011The Great Recession heralded the beginning of a new global era. On the one hand, it has exposed fault lines in the global economy, particularly in the advanced economies. On the other hand, the recovery from the recession is being propelled by the dynamism and extraordinary growth in the leading developing countries. Even the “forgotten” continent of Africa is now both a new frontier of economic and other opportunities and host to some of the fastest-growing economies in the world. The concept and the emerging reality of BRICS – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – as a geopolitical and economic grouping of nations introduces a new dynamic to global governance and economic relations. BRICS is now part of the vocabulary used to describe the shift in economic power southward and eastward. As the leaders of the BRICS nations stated in the Sanya Declaration, adopted at the April 2011 meeting in China which formally marked South Africa’s entry to the group: “We share the view that the world is undergoing far-reaching, complex and profound changes, marked by the strengthening of multi-polarity, economic globalization and increasing interdependence.”Shaping the trendsThe BRICS nations not only reflect the shifting trends of the new global economic order but are increasingly shaping it. In the Sanya Declaration, BRICS, under the banner, “Broad Vision, Shared Prosperity,” indicated its members’ common aspiration: It is the overarching objective and strong shared desire for peace, security, development and cooperation that brought together BRICS countries with a total population of nearly 3-billion from different continents. BRICS aims at contributing significantly to the development of humanity and establishing a more equitable and fair world. The 21st century should be marked by peace, harmony, cooperation and scientific development.” The reality is that the BRICS nations represent 42 percent of the world’s population and 18 percent of its GDP. China’s economy, after three decades of 10 percent expansion, massive foreign investment, and now domestic market-led growth has lifted some four hundred million people out of poverty and is creating a middle class at a phenomenal rate. It has seen urbanization approaching twenty-million people a year. China’s economy has grown ninety times since Deng Xiaoping began the liberalization in 1978, paving the way for China’s integration into the global economy. China has surpassed Japan as the world’s second-largest economy, after the United States. India, with its established democracy and massive rural poverty, has succeeded in creating an economic miracle led by technology and services that has laid the foundation for long-term sustainable growth and put India at the forefront of BRICS. Brazil has come into its own as the leading Latin American economy. It is finding large-scale synergy with China in joint ventures based on an exchange of natural resources and oil for low-cost manufactured goods. Russia likewise possesses a formidable economy, not least due to its role as a leading oil and gas producer. Its potential as a trade partner and expertise in science and technology make Russia a valuable ally for fellow BRICS members.World watershedsThe shift in global trends is on such a scale that it is almost impossible to perceive the full impact of the changes as they happen. The present transition to a new global order has been developing for some time, but in the last two decades there have been some significant milestones:The collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989 in response to democracy uprisings in Eastern Europe speeded the end of the Soviet system and marked the beginning of a new order. At that time, it was by no means clear what would replace the Soviet system, or whether democracy would be sustainable. There was a watershed moment in 1999 when a coalition of environmentalists, trade unionists, and students began a wave of anti-globalization protests at the annual World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle.  The following year similar protests took place at the World Economic Forum in Davos, at the meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Washington, at another World Bank meeting in Prague, and at the Group of Eight (G-8) summit in Montreal.  The year 2000 proved to be momentous, and not merely because it launched a new millennium. The United Nations adopted the Millennium Development Goals, which sought to halve global poverty by 2015 by achieving clearly defined objectives. The Goals have particular relevance for Africa.  In 2001, the World Economic Forum for the first time invited trade unionists and major non-governmental organizations, such as Oxfam and Save the Children, to its annual meeting in Davos in a bid to accommodate some of those who had been protesting in Seattle and elsewhere.  By the time major anti-globalization protests erupted again at the 2001 G-8 summit in Genoa, it was clear that the group was in trouble. A year before, it had begun the process of bringing five developing nations to the G-8 summit in Okinawa as non-member participants in order to discuss anti-poverty measures and climate change.  In 2008, the world’s financial system was shaken to the core with a global financial crisis. Soon followed the Great Recession, which saw the gap between so-called emerging and industrialized nations widening. The September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks had marked the point at which developing markets began to grow faster than the industrialized G-8 countries.  By 2008, the Group of Twenty (G-20), a new, expanded grouping of leading economies, had its first meeting in Washington to discuss financial markets and the global economy; it rapidly developed into a body that could play a bigger role in addressing a broader set of issues.  China has experienced a phenomenal rise as an economic power. That this change has been more gradual than the other milestone events of the past quarter century in no way diminishes the profound impact it is having on the global order.  In 2011, the democracy uprisings in the Arab world, similar to the revolutions in Eastern Europe two decades earlier, represents another important geopolitical shift. The recent woes of the euro suggest there will be further upheavals in currency markets as well as fresh tremors in the global financial system. The future is East and SouthThese developments, among many others, signal that a global “tipping point” has probably been reached, that the world is living through an exciting and uncertain transition to a new era. Historic shifts require that the mindsets and paradigms through which we analyze and understand this world, as well as plan and act within it, must be “reloaded” to adjust to new realities. I was most interested to find that, as one fellow panelist at the Economist’s Emerging Markets Summit in London last year said, clearly the future is East and South. Western business people and investors need to “reload the mindset,” as he put it. In other words, as you reformat the disk or memory stick of your computer, you have to reformat the investor mindset. In reformatting, you must begin to develop and embrace a different world view – one that is coming from a different space and different directions: the East and the South. If we want to do business in the future, the panelist was saying, appreciating this change in world view will be crucial to enabling businesses and investors to understand the new world in which they are required to operate. Indeed, it is clear that business people have already started using their minds – and their feet – to move in that direction. I think we are talking about a shift from a decades-old tradition to a new way of doing things. The same applies to the approach and perceptions of Africa. I visited the United Kingdom in March 2010 as part of the delegation of South African President Jacob Zuma on his state visit. Interactions with business leaders, analysts, and investors there suggested that the mood was still quite uncertain about Africa and South Africa. Six months later, I travelled to Britain with a delegation led by Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe. The mood had changed quite fundamentally. Part of it was surprise over how in 2010 South Africa had successfully hosted one of the largest sporting events, the Fifa World Cup, which resulted in a very different and positive experience and perception of the country.The purpose and potential of BRICSThe Sanya Declaration reflects a distinct ethos and orientation by the BRICS nations in their approach to various issues, for instance:“The overarching objective and strong shared desire for peace, security, development and cooperation.” “Contributing to world peace, security and stability, boosting global economic growth, enhancing multilateralism and promoting greater democracy in international relations.”  “We are determined to continue strengthening the BRICS partnership for common development and advance BRICS cooperation in a gradual and pragmatic manner, reflecting the principles of openness, solidarity and mutual assistance. We reiterate that such cooperation is inclusive and non-confrontational.” Equally, the wide-ranging initiatives and issues that BRICS is and will be addressing in the year ahead are also suggestive of the kind of influence that the member nations could have on global dynamics if these initiatives are backed by serious intent and consensus:“In a spirit of mutual respect and collective decision making, global economic governance should be strengthened, democracy in international relations should be promoted, and the voice of emerging and developing countries in international affairs should be enhanced.” “Our increased cooperation in economic, finance and trade matters, which will contribute to the long-term steady, sound and balanced growth of the world economy.”  “We support the Group of Twenty (G-20) in playing a bigger role in global economic governance as the premier forum for international economic cooperation.”  “Recognizing that the international financial crisis has exposed the inadequacies and deficiencies of the existing international monetary and financial system, we support the reform and improvement of the international monetary system, with a broad-based international reserve currency system providing stability and certainty.”  “We call for more attention to the risks of massive cross-border capital flows now faced by the emerging economies.”  “We call for further international financial regulatory oversight and reform, strengthening policy coordination and financial regulation and supervision cooperation, and promoting the sound development of global financial markets and banking systems.”  “Climate change is one of the global threats challenging the livelihood of communities and countries. China, Brazil, Russia and India appreciate and support South Africa’s hosting of [the upcoming climate change summit].”  “We support the development and use of renewable energy resources. We recognize the important role of renewable energy as a means to address climate change. We are convinced of the importance of cooperation and information exchange in the field of development of renewable energy resources.”  “We underscore our firm commitment to strengthen dialogue and cooperation in the fields of social protection, decent work, gender equality, youth, and public health, including the fight against HIV/Aids.”  “We support infrastructure development in Africa and its industrialization within framework of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad).”  “We have agreed to continue further expanding and deepening economic, trade and investment cooperation among our countries. We encourage all countries to refrain from resorting to protectionist measures.” BRICS initiativesBRICS has taken important initiatives in the spirit of the Sanya Declaration. The member nations have decided in principle to establish mutual credit lines denominated in local currencies rather than US dollars, a move that is seen to promote cooperation between countries over a wide range of projects and has proven able to facilitate trade and investment between these countries. Such arrangements are already working to the mutual benefit of China and Brazil, deepening China’s relationship with Brazil’s state-owned oil company, Petrobras. Recently, China Development Bank Chairman Chen Yuan has said that the bank is prepared to lend up to $1.5-billion in local currency to fellow BRICS countries, particularly for oil and gas projects. In May, after the resignation of Dominique Strauss-Kahn, BRICS called on the IMF to appoint a new director on the basis of merit and transparency, not according to a particular region. The new approach to the selection process for such appointments must reflect the shift in global economic power. It is the first time that a group of developing nations has had the clout to put effective pressure on a leading international organization to select a chief executive who reflects the importance of emerging markets in the global economy. The IMF is an important institution and I think there are also historical issues at stake, whether the institution continues to operate as it always has done, or whether the twenty-first century has indeed arrived for everyone concerned.BRICS and AfricaThe rising power of the BRICS lobby holds potentially far-reaching consequences for the relationship between China and Africa in general and is likely to have a profound impact on China’s rapidly growing trade and investment relationship with South Africa. There are some similarities between the rise of Africa now as a priority investment destination and that of China three decades ago, when that country began opening its economy to global forces. Africa is set to achieve growth levels that will empower its nearly one-billion citizens and enable the continent to elevate millions from poverty. The key elements in China’s economic miracle have been an integrated market, special economic zones with incentives for foreign investors, and widespread reform of the agricultural system, which has freed up more labor for economic development. China’s lifting of four hundred million people out of poverty in the space of three decades is unprecedented. This is the question facing Africa’s fifty-three countries: how can we rapidly realize the economic promise of the continent and do so in a way in which hundreds of millions of poor and marginalized people have jobs, move out of poverty, and fulfill their potential? As African nations tackle these issues, the BRICS formation offers interesting trajectories for an alternative economic model that ensures job-creating growth and different forms of inclusivity and equity. But the African miracle will be distinct and will need to be based on home grown formulas tailored to the continent’s conditions, strengths, and specific needs. The key will lie in unlocking the huge entrepreneurial potential of the continent. Africa’s greatest disadvantage among advanced economies is probably in the area of perceptions. The huge deficit between the reality of Africa and the mainstream media’s obsession with negative stereotypes of conflict, famine, and failed states undermines the continent’s potential. The mainstream media have dominated the narrative for the past four decades, and through selective – rather than inaccurate – reporting have reinforced Africa’s negative trends at the expense of its potential.Africa as investment destinationThere are many reasons why Africa’s potential as an investment destination should be taken more seriously:In the past few decades, Africa has made significant strides toward democratic governance, transparent economic systems, and elimination of some of the crippling bureaucratic barriers to trade and investment. Although Africa still falls far short of constituting an integrated market, the trends toward integration and greater transparency are undeniable. The inclusion of South Africa as the fifth member of the BRICS group and its seat on the UN Security Council for 2011-12 ensure that Africa has a voice in all key global forums and will accelerate reform of the UN and global financial, developmental, and trade architecture.  The potential of Africa as an investment destination has long been recognized and supported, both in terms of investment and soft loans by China and with strategic investments from South Africa and other rising economies such as India and Turkey.  There is ample evidence of Africa’s potential to leap-frog constraints, such as with the revolution in mobile telephone technology. The next breakthrough will need to come in the field of electricity provision. Africa’s hydroelectric potential could play a key role.  In a world in which there is growing consensus that future wars will be fought over food and water resources – rather than territory or ideology – Africa enjoys the advantage of huge water reserves and vast tracts of arable land. It is also rich in largely unexploited mineral and natural resources.  Africa, with nearly one-billion people, represents the world’s third-largest market after China (1.3-billion) and India (1.1-billion).  South Africa played a key part in rescuing the 2009 climate change summit in Copenhagen. There was enough progress at Cancun in 2010 to ensure that the next critical session, in Durban in December, could broker the breakthrough that the world so badly needs. South Africa’s roleFor President Zuma, South Africa’s participation in BRICS is not a question of boxing above its weight. It is basic logic that a continent central to sustainable global growth should be included in a grouping that includes the major developing markets in Asia and Latin America. As the last frontier of the global economy and its third-largest market, the continent must have its say in the renovation of the international economic and political architecture, the establishment of a more equitable and sustainable trade dispensation, and agreement on climate change to ensure the future of the planet for all its inhabitants. All the BRICS nations are increasing trade with – and investment in – Sub-Saharan Africa as an indication of their interest in its growing consumer market and resources. President Zuma has already overseen a rapid deepening of South Africa’s relationship with China. He has also stressed that South Africa needs to balance its trade with China to reduce the heavy deficit in China’s favor. He foresaw cooperation between the two countries in reforming multilateral institutions. South Africa’s economy is only slightly larger than that of Egypt or Nigeria, two other leading economic forces on the continent. However, South Africa has a more diversified economy, and highly developed financial institutions, infrastructure, and expertise are more entrenched. South Africa’s position as the only G-20 member from Africa facilitated the continent’s entry into BRICS. South Africa is both a benefactor of better access to BRICS markets and, at the same time, a competitor or joint venture partner in the development of Africa. Africa grew at 4.5 to 5 percent last year and is expected to reach 5.5 to 5.7 percent this year. South Africa is set for a more modest 4 percent. Aware of the massive savings pool that China and other BRICS nations are sitting on, President Zuma is inviting investors from BRICS countries to take up the major infrastructure and manufacturing opportunities in South Africa and on the African continent. Both the private and public sectors of the country stand to be leading beneficiaries of this offer.Shift in South Africa’s trading patternsIt is no coincidence that since the beginning of 2010, President Zuma has made his first state visits to India, Russia, and China. In July 2010, Brazil’s former president, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, paid a state visit to South Africa following a working visit by President Zuma earlier in the year. President Zuma lost no time in meeting the new Brazilian president, Dilma Rousseff, at the BRICS summit in China last April. Two-way trade between China and South Africa reached R119.7-billion ($17.9-billion) in 2009, enabling China to surpass the US as South Africa’s largest trading partner, according to South Africa’s Department of Trade and Industry. Its statistics also show that South Africa’s exports to India reached R5-billion ($746-million) in 2010, while imports totalled R2-billion ($298-million), in favor of South Africa. The fundamental shift in South Africa’s trading patterns was also clear from statements made by President Zuma during and after his state visit to China last August. South Africa, he said, would look to China for investment in meeting its infrastructure projects, including transport systems, freight transport, renewable energy projects, and mining. The agricultural sector and car manufacturing were also potential recipients of Chinese investment. The stage has been set for accelerated investment from both the BRICS and advanced economies. In 2007, the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China bought a 20 percent stake in South Africa’s Standard Bank for R36-billion ($5.4-billion), making it China’s largest foreign investment to date. In 2009, China announced that the African headquarters of the China-Africa fund would be in Johannesburg. China has more recently invested in a South African platinum mine and a cement factory. One of the tangible agreements emerging from the state visit to China in August 2010 was the intention to build a high-speed rail link between Durban and Johannesburg. The consistent message that President Zuma conveyed during his state visits to China and Russia was that South Africa wanted to learn from both countries how to ensure high levels of beneficiation of South African mineral wealth to help the country speed up development, create more jobs, and roll back poverty.South Africa’s New Growth PathThis approach is in line with South Africa’s recently adopted economic road map – known as the New Growth Path – which lays much emphasis on local input and joint ventures to create jobs and boost manufacturing and the beneficiation of minerals and natural resources. The growing relationship with China is seen as a means of both boosting South Africa’s share of global trade and accelerating the development of the African continent. With its world-class financial sector, deep experience in African markets, and extensive corporate footprint on the African continent, South Africa is well placed to lead an African miracle. As the pace of regional integration within the Southern African Development Community (SADC) quickens – a goal that President Zuma has made a top priority – the economic rewards for South Africa will come in the form of increased foreign direct investment and expanding trade relations. The evolving free trade agreement between the overlapping regional economic communities of the SADC, the Common Market of East and Southern Africa (Comesa), and the East African Community (EAC) is likely to give further impetus to this process. South Africa is thinking BRICS. It is expanding flight connections and marketing tourism to the BRICS nations as well as tailoring investment opportunities and conditions to meet the requirements of its new strategic partners. It is also looking to the BRICS countries to assist in training South African diplomats. South Africa’s robust private sector also stands to benefit from these opportunities. Standard Bank was ahead of the game when they sold the 20 percent stake to the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China. BRICS, with Africa now represented in the grouping, will deepen South-South cooperation and have the potential to change the rules of international finance and trade and give a voice to developing countries on a whole range of issues ranging from climate change to development. But there is a danger that BRICS could lose faith in the WTO. Brazil, India, and China have criticized the WTO for failing to scrap the onerous subsidies of the developed nations in the agricultural industry. Russia is not a member of the WTO. It will take some time for South Africa to achieve a more sustainable trade balance with China by getting the Chinese engaged in more joint ventures, manufacturing, and beneficiation in line with the New Growth Path that seeks more leverage from foreign investors. Despite China’s position as South Africa’s biggest two-way trade partner based on South African exports of mineral resources, the European Union remains South Africa’s most important export market and responsible for 40 percent of foreign investment. While the US is set to remain by far the most powerful global economy in the next two decades, the changes now under way and symbolized by the BRICS group will prepare the ground for profound changes in the global order in the next twenty to twenty-five years.Challenges aheadMembership in BRICS has put South Africa in the league of the world’s fastest growing and potentially most influential group of nations. And that puts South Africa and the African continent at the cutting edge of the global changes taking place. One of the urgent challenges is global warming. With South Africa serving its second term on the UN Security Council and President Zuma’s appointment as co-chair of the Durban climate change summit, the country is well placed to help forge a grand trade-off between the industrialized and developing worlds. The Durban meeting, formally known as the 17th Convention of the Parties of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, or COP 17-CMP 7, stands to make major progress by establishing either a reformed global market mechanism to regulate emissions or by extending the current one to include the US and China. China, because of necessity and its history of pragmatic adjustment, could become the world leader in developing cleaner and more sustainable technologies that will supplement and ultimately replace fossil fuels as the world’s primary source of energy. South Africa is well able to contribute to this global priority. After hosting the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002 and more recently committing to the Clean Development Mechanism, South Africa has vowed to reach its targets on reducing emissions and carbon management. But in a country with high unemployment and underdevelopment, we must continually weigh the dictates of environmental management with those of developmental priorities. In global governance, the “tipping point” could well be with us. South Africa is privileged to be part of these historic trends. Like all previous eras, this one will have its own challenges. Balancing national self-interest with genuine global interest will be one of them. The BRICS nations will be key players in the forging of a more cooperative, interdependent, prosperous, sustainable, and equitable world. This article was first published by The Cairo Review of Global Affairslast_img read more

December 16

Is Tripolymer Spray Foam Insulation a Healthy Choice?

first_img GREEN PRODUCT GUIDE According to C.P. Chemical, the foam won’t melt, and won’t support combustion. Its combustion byproducts are “significantly less toxic” than those of white pine.Like polyurethane insulation, Tripolymer is a two-part compound. Unlike polyurethane foams, Tripolymer 105 does not expand as it’s applied. It solidifies within 30 seconds and has a density of between 0.8 lb. and 1.3 lb. per cubic foot. Cured Tripolymer has a perm rating of 15.5 to 16.9 per inch and R-5.1 per inch. The company says it shows no thermal degradation over time.Here’s where the confusion sets in.Cassie responds that tripolymer is urea-formaldehyde insulation. “It is plastic. Will not burn, but it will melt and the fumes will kill you. Recently marketed in Canada under the name Retro foam. Once the Canadian government found out, the company was shut down and is now in a 500 million dollar lawsuit. Marketed around the US by various names the producer is CP Chemical out of White Plains New York.”Cassie is half right. There is indeed a product called RetroFoam , sold by Polymaster in Knoxville, TN.And it is a urea-formaldehyde insulation that is identified on the company’s Web site as a “tri-polymer resin.”Banned in CanadaHealth Canada in February 2009 issued an advisory warning consumers that RetroFoam of Canada “imported and illegally sold” a product that had been banned there since 1980 under the country’s Hazardous Products Act.“Health Canada issued a ‘cease and desist’ letter to RetroFoam of Canada Incorporated, the Canadian importer of the insulation, to stop all importation and sale of RetroFoam in Canada,” the advisory said. “Health Canada also instructed Enerliv, the Canadian distributor of RetroFoam, to stop all sale, advertisement and further installations of the product and to call back any unused product.”The problem is off-gassing formaldehyde, a chemical that can cause a variety of health problems and is listed by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible carcinogen in humans.Urea-formaldehyde is found in some pressed wood products, such as particleboard, hardwood plywood paneling and medium density fiberboard.Urea-formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) installed during the 1970s resulted in “relatively high indoor concentrations of formaldehyde,” the EPA says. “Few homes are now being insulated with this product. Studies show that formaldehyde emissions from UFFI decline with time; therefore, homes in which UFFI was installed many years ago are unlikely to have high levels of formaldehyde now.”True enough, Polymaster says, RetroFoam is banned in Canada, as well as in California, Massachusetts and Vermont.But, the company adds, the insulation has been reformulated since its original introduction and now meets federal emission standards. Some regulatory agencies just haven’t caught up.No connection, says C.P. ChemicalFair or not, urea-formaldehyde foam insulation has a bad reputation and still makes potential home buyers nervous. RetroFoam’s use of the word “tri-polymer” may be a marketing detour around the problem. Click on “About” at the company’s Web site and you’ll look in vain for any mention of its urea-formaldehyde formulationBut whatever similarities in Web-site jargon, there is no connection between RetroFoam and C.P. Chemical, maker of Tripolymer 105.None, C.P. says. Nor is Tripolymer 105 a urea-formaldehyde product.In the end, we have two different products, both of which differ from polyurethane foams, king of the high-performance insulation market.We asked Alex Wilson, founder of BuildingGreen and publisher of the GreenSpec Directory for his take on the question:First, Wilson says, it’s “remarkably difficult” to get detailed, reliable information from foam manufacturers. Urea-formaldehyde was a real problem back in the 1970s, enough so that the Canadian government launched a program to remove it from houses, Wilson says. As a result, some manufacturers shifted to a phenol-formaldehyde formulation that proved better at chemically binding formaldehyde and lowering emissions.The same can be said of certain wood products: products made with phenol-formaldehyde resin off-gas less than urea-formaldehyde products.Polyurethane foams may be the better choiceWilson says his “expectation” would be that polyurethane foams are, on the whole, healthier choices. After they have cured, VOC emissions are extremely low and the foam should pose no problems to all but those who have chemical sensitivities. In any event, they don’t off-gas formaldehyde. He’s “not as confident” of either phenol- or urea-formaldehyde products.Bottom Line: Third-party testing neededIn the end, he adds, the discussion points to the benefits of a third-party testing program that does not currently exist. That would make it easier for consumers like Cordano to get basic health and safety information about products they’re tempted to put into their homes. VIDEO: Green Builder Won’t Compromise on the Envelope InsulationSprayed Insulation When builders talk about spray-foam insulation, we assume they’re referring to a two-part polyurethane compound. But not always, as a recent Q&A demonstrates.Amanda Cordano launched an interesting but inconclusive conversation when she asked for advice on “Tripolymer product,” which had been told was a green product with no health risks.Cordano found nothing to contradict that in her queries on the web, but she points out that all the sites she found were sponsored by foam companies. “Do you have any information on the potential downside of this foam?” she asks.Which ‘tripolymer’ is it?The first step might be to identify exactly what Cordano is asking about. “Tripolymer” is a product of C.P. Chemical Co. of White Plains, NY, marketed as Tripolymer 105. The company says it is composed of “modified phenolic based methylene bound copolymers” that were first developed by C.P. Chemical in 1966 as a fire resistant thermal and acoustic insulation. RELATED MULTIMEDIA Does Spray Foam Insulation Out-Gas Poisonous Fumes?Insulation ChoicesSpray Foam Insulation: Open and Closed CellPRO/CON: Open-Cell Foam Beats Closed-Cell FoamPRO/CON: Closed-Cell Foam Beats Open-Cell Foam RELATED ARTICLES last_img read more

December 9

If You Believe You Already Know Everything

first_imgSome people believe they know everything they need to know.By believing they know everything, they also believe there is nothing they need to learn. And because there is nothing they need to learn, it’s impossible for them to improve their results—at least until they are willing to give up believing they know everything and are willing to learn something new.It’s starts with your beliefs.You Won’t Change Your BeliefsIf you believe you already know everything you need to know, you won’t easily change your beliefs. And if you aren’t willing to change your beliefs, you aren’t going to change your results. Here is the uncomfortable truth: your results right now are the outcome of what you believe.Your sales results are the outcome of what you believe about prospecting, what you believe about who are the right targets, what you believe about the value you create, and what you believe about your buyers.Your income is the product of your beliefs about money. Your health is the outcome of what you believe about diet, exercise, and stress. Your relationships are the consequence of what you believe about relationships and about people.Your beliefs drive your actions.You Won’t Change Your ActionsYou’ve heard this statement before, “If you keep on doing what you’ve always done, you’ll keep on getting what you’ve always gotten.” That’s a true statement, but it leaves out the fact that if you “keep on believing” what you’ve always believed, you aren’t going to change what you are doing.If you won’t change your beliefs about something because you already “know” everything you need to know, then you won’t take new and different actions. And if you won’t take new actions, you won’t produce new and better results.Breakthrough results—innovations—don’t come from doing the same thing you did before. Breakthroughs come from revolutionary beliefs and revolutionary actions.What Do You KnowIt’s okay to have strong convictions, especially when they are based on big principles. But as soon as you cut yourself off from the possibility that you may be wrong, that something else may be true, you eliminate your ability to improve.Your ability to learn the new ideas and take the new actions that will give you breakthrough results begin with your ability to forget what you believe you know long enough to explore new beliefs and new ideas.If you know that cold calling doesn’t work, then you aren’t going to be open to trying new actions and new approaches that might result in business. I know this. I am old enough to believe cold calling works, and flexible enough in that belief to have just booked an appointment using LinkedIn. Maybe you like to believe social selling is the only way to prospect, but are you flexible enough to believe something else—like maybe it isn’t the only thing that works?If you know your clients buy on price alone, you aren’t going to be open to trying on a belief that says that clients want to buy on the value created, the difference between price and cost. Believing price is the only factors your dream client will use to judge you will cause you to sell as if that’s true. But are you flexible enough to believe that if you created more value and sold that value that you could command a higher price?If you can’t try on a new belief, you can’t achieve a better result. If you already know everything you need to know, then you cut yourself off from learning, and cutting yourself off from learning is the fastest way to lock your results in right where they are now.How long have things been how they are right now? What beliefs locked in these results?QuestionsAre your strongest held beliefs about big principles? Or are they beliefs that protect you from having take actions that make you uncomfortable?When was the last time you abandoned a long-held belief?When was the last time a new belief changed your actions enough to produce a better result?Look at what you believe? How have your beliefs locked in the behaviors that have locked in your results? Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more