March 2

Aqueous Partners With nugs.net For Streams And Recordings Of All Future Shows

first_imgBuffalo, NY jammers Aqueous have been on an absolute tear of late, and things are only getting better for the band, as they have announced a partnership with nugs.net to bring fans streams and recordings of all future shows. According to the group, all shows will be available to purchase for download, as well as available to stream through the nugs app for subscribers.Aqueous Shares Rocking Live Studio EP “Artifact” [Listen]The group is set to play Boulder, CO’s The Boulder Theatre this Friday and Saturday with Twiddle, which will be broadcast live via nugs.tv. Both shows are set to start at 7pm EDT sharp. In conjunction with their new partnership, Aqueous’ shows from The Fillmore in Philly (2/2/17), The Winter Werk Out in Columbus, OH (2/4/17), and The Bottleneck in Lawrence, KS (2/7/17) are all now available here.Aqueous is just began an extensive Winter tour. Check for dates near you below.Aqueous 2017 Tour Schedule2/9/2017: Ft. Collins, CO- Hodi’s Half Note2/10/2017: Boulder, CO- Boulder Theater (w-Twiddle)2/11/2017: Boulder, CO- Boulder Theater (w- Twiddle)2/12/2017: Steamboat Springs, CO- Schmiggity’s2/13/2017: Denver, CO- Larimer Lounge2/15/2017: Omaha, NE- Reverb Lounge2/16/2017: Columbia, MO- Rose Music Hall2/17/2017: St. Louis, MO- The Bootleg @ Atomic Cowboy2/18/2017: Bloomington, IN- The Bluebird2/24/2017: Greensboro, NC- The Blind Tiger (w BIG Something)3/2/2017: Morgantown, WV- 123 Pleasant Street3/3/2017: Cleveland, OH- Beachland Tavern3/4/2017: Buffalo, NY- Town Ballroom (w- Twiddle)3/5/2017: Buffalo, NY- Town Ballroom (w- Twiddle)3/17/2017: Keene, NH- The Colonial Theatre (w- Twiddle)3/18/2017: Keene, NH- The Colonial Theatre (w- Twiddle)3/23/2017: Rochester, NY- Flour City Station3/24/2017: Stroudsburg, PA- Sherman Theater (w- Twiddle)3/25/2017: Washington, DC- 9:30 Club (w- Twiddle)3/31/2017: New York, NY- PlayStation Theater (w- Twiddle)4/1/2017: New York, NY- PlayStation Theater (w- Twiddle)last_img read more

December 18

3 ways to help employees adjust to change

first_imgCompanies experience change on a constant basis. Whether the change is tiny or huge, it can be difficult for your staff to adjust. Sometimes change can be scary, and as a leader it’s your job to help your employees understand and adapt to the changes. Here are three ways you can help your team succeed during this adjustment process.Feedback: When change occurs, it can be overwhelming. Your employees may immediately have a million questions, but sometimes there can be a lot confusion. Seek feedback from every member of your team and to make sure everyone is on the same page. Giving your team detailed explanations to their questions will hopefully lead to more discussion that will eventually lead to clarity and understanding.Training: When new processes and products are launched, make sure the training required is adequate and thorough. The last thing you want is for your team to feel like they’re running around like headless chickens. Make sure each and every employee feels confident, prepared, and ready to perform their new responsibilities with excellence.Availability: Just because training is completed, it doesn’t necessarily guarantee that your transition will be smooth sailing. Even if your staff is prepared, there will be bumps along the way. Check in frequently at first and be more encouraging than critical. Your team wants to adjust and be able to handle things on their own, but they’ll definitely need you to be supportive along the way. 23SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

August 6

Washington State Recycling Association Honors Three Local Organizations

first_imgFacebook31Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Thurston County Solid WasteThree out of the nine 2014 Washington State Recycling Association’s (WSRA) Recycler of the Year awards went to organizations here in Thurston County. Each year, a diverse panel of WSRA members chooses organizations, businesses, and individuals who have made outstanding recycling achievements. WSRA members represent a variety of aspects of the recycling industry, including collectors and processors, government agencies, businesses, and non-profit organizations. Recipients will receive their awards at the Recyclers of the Year Awards Banquet on Tuesday, May 6 during WSRA’s annual conference.City of Olympia Public Works Waste ReSources – Public Agency Recycler of the YearWSRA recognized the City of Olympia for their accomplishments and new programs centered on their Vision of Zero Waste, a mission to lead and inspire their community toward a waste-free future and to play a strategic role to create opportunities to eliminate waste. Olympia’s innovative programs include their award-winning GrassCycling Virtual Workshop, Pedestrian Recycling, 3rd Grade Education Program, Business Waste Assessments, and Lakefair Parade Recycling.Olympia School District’s Child Nutrition Services Department – Youth Education Recycler of the YearWSRA recognized the Olympia School District for implementing some of the most innovative and visionary school food service waste reduction initiatives in the nation. These include using milk dispensers to reduce milk carton and milk waste; replacing disposables with durable utensils, bowls, cups, and trays; and participating in the Food Rescue program to collect prepared but unserved food for the Thurston County Food Bank. The Olympia School District has a 30-year history of reducing waste, and was one of the first school districts in the state to implement comprehensive recycling and organics collection programs.Thurston County Solid Waste’s Plastic Whale Project – Societal Impact Recycler of the YearWSRA recognized the Plastic Whale Project for uniquely combining art and marine biology with the goal of preventing waste. Thurston County Solid Waste Division educator Carrie Zeigler conceived a plan to marry her artistic skills with her environmental education job by having local school children assist with the creation of a giant whale sculpture that would use plastic bags and other plastic waste. The large-scale art project was a way for kids to get a hands–on experience while learning about the harmful effects of plastic waste on the environment and wildlife. The project brought together more than 900 people from all walks of life to create a 32 foot replica of a gray whale made entirely out of plastic bags and other waste commonly found in our oceans. More than 100,000 people viewed the whale in person, and it was seen on television by 1.65 million people.last_img read more