May 7

OnTheMarket.com is losing traffic and branches, claims online agent

first_imgEmoov and its founder Russell Quirk have launched an extraordinary broadside against OnTheMarket.com during which Quirk suggests it is showing “signs of terminal decline” and calls for it to drop its two-portal rule.eMoov says it has looked at data from web monitoring service Hitwise that reveals how traffic to OnTheMarket.com declined during February both year-on-year and month-on-month.Visits to the website in February were down 38% versus January, although it’s part of a seasonal trend; ZPG and Rightmove’s traffic figures were also down, by 2% each. Web traffic tends to surge during January after the festive break and then drop back down again in February.eMoov also says OnTheMarket is “haemorrhaging” branches in recent weeks and that, based on its own research among the portal’s listings, they declined by “almost 200” over the past three weeks and “looks set to fall below levels seen this time last year”,” it says.“This data highlights that two years on and despite tens of millions of pounds of investment, OnTheMarket’s audience remains a small fraction of the main portals and appears to be declining as users are clearly not engaged with the brand or proposition,” says Russell Quirk (pictured, left)OnTheMarket says it is not the first time that Russell Quirk has predicted that its business is about to fail, and points out that in July 2015, six months after its launch, he said it would “fizzle out” before its first birthday.“But the reality is that in January 2017, OnTheMarket celebrated its second anniversary already established as a major portal with a record 11.2 million visits,” a spokesman told The Negotiator.“While Mr Quirk is entitled to his opinion, the thousands of estate and letting agents who choose to list their properties at OnTheMarket.com are equally entitled to theirs. The overwhelming majority of our members remain strongly supportive of OnTheMarket.com and understand better than anyone their long-term objectives to regain control of their data and costs.“This has never been more important than now after Rightmove’s management last week sketched-out the sustainability of growth to £2,500 ARPA longer-term’ and ZPG’s acquisitions of Expert Agent and Hometrack.“We remain as determined as ever to build the best portal for consumers and agents alike.”OnTheMarket.com Russell Quirk Emoov March 3, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » OnTheMarket.com is losing traffic and branches, claims online agent previous nextProducts & ServicesOnTheMarket.com is losing traffic and branches, claims online agentBut OTM says it is enjoying record traffic and that a majority of member agents support it as Rightmove and ZPG grow in influence and cost.Nigel Lewis3rd March 201701,523 Viewslast_img read more

May 2

Mayor Bhalla to kick off Gun Violence Awareness Day

first_imgEytan Stern WeberCommunications Co-Lead for Moms Demand Action of New Jersey Dear Editor:Saturday, June 2, is National Gun Violence Awareness Day. Some might remember this as the day every year when thousands of people around the country wore orange and rallied in front of city halls, marched down roads, and across bridges. This year, Hoboken’s chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America is kicking off the event on June 1 at 4 p.m., in front of City Hall, where Mayor Bhalla will issue a proclamation honoring our efforts.This annual event started five years ago, after Hadiya Pendleton was taken by gun violence. Hadiya was a high schooler, an advocate against gun violence, and just a few days prior to her death, one of the performers at President Obama’s inauguration. And so, her friends decided to take on the struggle for justice in America by starting National Gun Violence Awareness Day, so that Hadiya, and all innocent victims of gun violence, would not have died in vain. They chose to wear orange because it was the universal signal amongst responsible gun owners that they were people, not targets.So, we invite everyone who would like to join us, Mayor Bhalla, Governor Murphy, Hadiya’s dedicated friends, the student activists from Parkland, Fla., and tens of thousands of others around the country in our fight for gun violence prevention, to come to Hoboken City Hall on June 1 at 4 p.m. wearing orange. For a future free from gun violence, we must use our voices and turn awareness into action. And when this many people come together, no one won’t hear our voices, and no one won’t see our actions.Emily Ball JabbourTeam Leader for Hudson County Chapter, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in Americalast_img read more

April 21

2006:THE YEAR AHEAD

first_imgWe hope to stimulate government ministers, civil servants and local authorities to recognise the importance of small shops on the high streets. We use the term ‘high street’, but it could be a suburban shopping centre, a village or small shops in general. I would like to see progress on planning issues and making access to high streets better. I’m also looking for more support for town centre management partnerships, which are partnerships between local authorities and local traders to improve town centres. Parking will continue to be a major issue. The supermarkets recognise this. They provide a lot of free parking, as well as free buses, for people without cars to access their stores. People want an easy way to do their shopping.The year ahead is going to be difficult because the National Minimum Wage, which was last increased in October, is starting to have an effect, as are high energy prices. People that are not proactive in running their businesses, that don’t react by adjusting pricing and costing, are going to get a shock when their accounts come in in a year’s time.I think the outcome of world trade talks could have an effect on agricultural prices, which could affect grain prices and vegetable oils. We’ve already seen an effect on sugar prices (following an overhaul of the European sugar subsidy regime.)These changes could affect the industry in the longer term, either in a positive or a negative way. As far I’m concerned, I shall retire this year after 40 years in the baking industry.last_img read more

March 2

Aqueous Partners With nugs.net For Streams And Recordings Of All Future Shows

first_imgBuffalo, NY jammers Aqueous have been on an absolute tear of late, and things are only getting better for the band, as they have announced a partnership with nugs.net to bring fans streams and recordings of all future shows. According to the group, all shows will be available to purchase for download, as well as available to stream through the nugs app for subscribers.Aqueous Shares Rocking Live Studio EP “Artifact” [Listen]The group is set to play Boulder, CO’s The Boulder Theatre this Friday and Saturday with Twiddle, which will be broadcast live via nugs.tv. Both shows are set to start at 7pm EDT sharp. In conjunction with their new partnership, Aqueous’ shows from The Fillmore in Philly (2/2/17), The Winter Werk Out in Columbus, OH (2/4/17), and The Bottleneck in Lawrence, KS (2/7/17) are all now available here.Aqueous is just began an extensive Winter tour. Check for dates near you below.Aqueous 2017 Tour Schedule2/9/2017: Ft. Collins, CO- Hodi’s Half Note2/10/2017: Boulder, CO- Boulder Theater (w-Twiddle)2/11/2017: Boulder, CO- Boulder Theater (w- Twiddle)2/12/2017: Steamboat Springs, CO- Schmiggity’s2/13/2017: Denver, CO- Larimer Lounge2/15/2017: Omaha, NE- Reverb Lounge2/16/2017: Columbia, MO- Rose Music Hall2/17/2017: St. Louis, MO- The Bootleg @ Atomic Cowboy2/18/2017: Bloomington, IN- The Bluebird2/24/2017: Greensboro, NC- The Blind Tiger (w BIG Something)3/2/2017: Morgantown, WV- 123 Pleasant Street3/3/2017: Cleveland, OH- Beachland Tavern3/4/2017: Buffalo, NY- Town Ballroom (w- Twiddle)3/5/2017: Buffalo, NY- Town Ballroom (w- Twiddle)3/17/2017: Keene, NH- The Colonial Theatre (w- Twiddle)3/18/2017: Keene, NH- The Colonial Theatre (w- Twiddle)3/23/2017: Rochester, NY- Flour City Station3/24/2017: Stroudsburg, PA- Sherman Theater (w- Twiddle)3/25/2017: Washington, DC- 9:30 Club (w- Twiddle)3/31/2017: New York, NY- PlayStation Theater (w- Twiddle)4/1/2017: New York, NY- PlayStation Theater (w- Twiddle)last_img read more

March 1

Design School turns 3D printers into PPE producers

first_img Harvard’s Family Van takes pulse on best ways to use these untapped resources Mobile clinics finding their place in pandemic The Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) began production of personal protective equipment (PPE) on Sunday, delivering its first run of 90 face shields to Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) on Tuesday.With more than 100 3D printers set up in the School’s Gund Hall, state-of-the-art fabrication technologies, and expert guidance from across Harvard University, the GSD is creating PPE for frontline medical personnel at area hospitals. The School expects to have produced components for about 1,000 face shields by the end of this week.The GSD estimates that it can produce about 3,500 3D-printed, polylactic acid (PLA) visors, and about 800 laser-cut polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG) face shields, with the materials currently available at the School. Chris Hansen, 3D fabrication specialist, and GSD Fabrication Lab colleagues are now seeking additional sources of supply. The GSD plans to produce the visors and face-shields as separate components, and to deliver them to Sherry Yu, coordinator of PPE Innovation and Conservation Workgroup in Logistics in Incident Command at BWH, for assembly and distribution.GSD efforts have been orchestrated by Stephen Ervin, assistant dean for information technology, and Hansen, in addition to GSD faculty and Harvard partners, which include the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard Medical School, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.With design guidance from Eric Höweler, associate professor in architecture, and Martin Bechthold, Kumagai Professor of Architectural Technology and director of Harvard’s Master in Design Engineering program, Hansen produced a face-shield prototype and determined the design could be effectively fabricated with the GSD’s 3D printers and laser-cutting equipment. After the face-shield design had been tested in a clinical trial at BWH, the School moved forward.“Few would have thought that one day we would leverage these resources to assist in fighting a pandemic, and yet that is exactly what the GSD’s Fabrication Lab is engaging in, along with many similar facilities across the country,” Bechthold says. “Schools, institutions, private companies, and individuals have come together in an often improvised, ad-hoc manner, driven by the conviction that this challenge can be overcome if we leverage the human imagination, think outside the box, and reach out beyond our comfort zone.”,“Fortunately, the maker movement has created a decentralized, rapid-prototyping network for small quantity production of components,” Höweler says. “Social networks were able to rally resources, and volunteers stepped up. It has been remarkable to see a flood of people wanting to help.”Alongside the ongoing Mass General Brigham’s Center for COVID Innovation (MGBCCI) and BHW conversations, Hansen and colleagues have fielded inquiries and considerations from the city of Boston, MIT, and other Harvard Schools regarding production and prototyping of materials and equipment.“In terms of production, we are well positioned to contribute in a meaningful way,” Hansen says. “There’s a lot happening in tandem, with ever-changing needs and priorities from health care providers. We are working to be as nimble as possible within the larger Harvard community to ensure that whatever effort and resources we do contribute are meaningful and impactful.”While campus buildings remain generally closed, the GSD has worked to ensure safety standards and industrial-hygiene protocols for staff who have been permitted to enter the GSD’s Gund Hall-based Fabrication Lab.Alongside their work on PPE face protection, Hansen and GSD Research Associate Saurabh Mhatre have also been advising a working group focused on creating prototypes of innovative PPE for full-body protection.“This is the first pandemic of the ‘jet age,’” Höweler observes, “but it’s also the first pandemic of the ‘digital fabrication age,’ where expertise and open-source content moves freely, and individuals are networked for a common cause. It may turn out to be the thing that brings us together in different ways.” Facing a pandemic, Broad does a quick pivot Relatedcenter_img How the institute converted a clinical processing lab into a large-scale COVID-19 testing facility in a matter of days University community rallies to deal with COVID-19 crisis Administrators, professors detail many and varied ways Harvard is trying to help, including offering use of hotel by Cambridge first-responders, health care workers last_img read more

February 27

3 Data Center Best Practices Every Mid-Market Organization Should Follow

first_imgIn today’s digital world, businesses are built on data. That data has value not only to the organizations that house it, but also to external and internal threats. In order to ensure that your business has the digital services it needs, you need trusted infrastructure. Research by ESG and Dell shows the return on investment, as well as risk reduction, that is obtained from running a trusted data center is significant. On the spectrum of Leader and Laggard IT organizations, 92 percent of leaders surveyed reported that investments in infrastructure technologies to maximize uptime and availability and minimize security risk have met or exceeded ROI forecasts.Mid-market organizations must quickly respond to changing business needs in order to get ahead of the competition when everyone is ‘always-on.’ How do companies maintain trusted data centers and compete to become the enterprises of tomorrow while also managing IT budgets very closely? The answer is in efficient solutions that enable businesses to do more with less and securely extend the value of their investments. Brands must also have the confidence and peace of mind that vital business data is protected and recoverable no matter where it resides.Why does leading in data center trust matter? The cost of being less secure is high. Surveyed firms estimate that their average hourly downtime due to security breaches cost is $30,000 to $38,000. Notably, 38 percent of line of business executives have serious concerns about IT’s security capabilities and controls. Additionally, security professionals are in high demand and hard to find.ESG has identified three best practices among trusted data center leaders, and how Dell Technologies solutions and PowerEdge servers help organizations achieve and support those best practices in an ‘always-on’ landscape.1. Prioritize market-leading BIOS/firmware security.Data flows in and out of servers faster than ever before, and it is crucial for organizations to protect this data. That’s why organizations need to ensure BIOS and firmware are up to date. Organizations that prioritize BIOS/firmware security are 2x more likely to say that their security technology delivers higher than expected ROI.And, it’s not just about BIOS improvements: it’s all the other features and functionality that helps ensure that technology continues to get better and more secure as you go along. Trusted data centers have increased functionality for security.2. Refresh server infrastructure frequently.ESG highlights the role hardware plays in the trusted data center and the benefits leaders who refresh their server infrastructure experience. For example, optimized infrastructure results in 41 percent reduction in downtime costs in a modern server environment. Organizations with modern server environments (servers that are less than 3 years old) save as much as $14.3M/year in avoided downtime versus organizations with legacy servers.That’s because old hardware can’t take on new threats. In the mid-market space, companies may not be aware of new threats that are emerging or may not think they’re big enough to be considered a target. The reality is they could be, and it is even more important to make sure that data center hardware is secure and up to date.Unfortunately, IT hardware doesn’t get better with time; the older it gets, the less reliable it becomes. It’s going to cost more to monitor and maintain older servers in head count, parts and resources needed to get those servers back up and running versus purchasing optimized hardware on a refresh cycle. It makes sense to refresh more quickly to make sure you’re getting all the latest technology. With more advanced systems, if you do experience issues, you have more failover capabilities.3. Automate server management.Highly automated organizations are 30 percent more likely to delivery highly reliable application and system uptime and reduce data loss events by 71 percent. Leaders are seeing tremendous value from automating their server management –they reported saving an average of 10.5 person-hours per week.How are Dell EMC PowerEdge Servers built to support trusted data centers? With so much at stake, security is one of the primary values that Dell builds into every single product we deliver. Our PowerEdge servers are engineered with security in mind for optimized infrastructure that lays the foundation to implement best practices.Security is an evolving landscape and so is server management; “secure today” does not guarantee secure tomorrow. Fortunately, PowerEdge servers provide security that is built-in, not bolted on, and all models leverage the same management capabilities. Automation is essential and Dell is continually expanding remediation and threat detection through our OpenManage Application, including new capabilities around power management for reducing overall power consumption.Dell Technologies infrastructure enables organizations to easily manage IT environments to solve their biggest challenges. To learn more about how Dell EMC PowerEdge servers are designed with the reliability, simplicity and security features needed to implement the above best practices, watch the ESG Trusted Data Center and Server Infrastructure Webinar (registration required).last_img read more

January 26

‘Dante Now!’ blends poetry, performance

first_imgEmily McConville | The Observer Amidst the many football-related activities of a fall Friday afternoon, the Italian studies program gave visitors and students alike a much different option last Friday.Students in various Italian classes, donning robes, red cloth caps and golden wreaths on their heads, walked around campus in groups and recited excerpts from the Italian poet Dante’s “Divine Comedy” as part of the annual “Dante Now! A Divine Comedy Flashmob.”“[The event is] to try to introduce people to Dante and show them how beautiful it is,” Italian studies research assistant professor Anne Leone said. “In my experience, a lot of people are kind of curious about Dante. It’s a nice way to answer some people’s questions.”According to the William and Katherine Devers Program in Dante Studies website, students read Dante’s work at various public places between 2 and 3 p.m., such as on the steps of Bond Hall, in front of the Library and in front of the main building. At 3 p.m., students, professors, parents of alumni and members of the public performed a choral reading of a section of Dante’s work at the Grotto. The readings were followed by a public talk in the Carey Auditorium in the Library and a reception.“’Dante Now!’ is a way to have more laymen experience the beauty of the ‘Divine Comedy’ because it’s still relevant today,” sophomore Mary Lien said. “The truth imparted in the ‘Divine Comedy’ really is something super relevant to the Catholic tradition on campus, so ‘Dante Now!’ gives people a chance to learn more about Dante, to read Dante in the modern time and be able to experience it firsthand.”Lien said the public nature of the event allows anyone to experience Dante’s works.“You don’t have to look at a poster beforehand, you just hear people on the street reciting Dante and can join in,” she said.Sophomore Greg Jenn said reading the poem aloud introduced people who might never have explored Dante to his poems.“As a group, we’re drawing people in,” Jenn said. “We’re not individuals, we’re inviting people into the community of Dante. It’s supposed to be read in a group.”Many students in Italian classes have been preparing for “Dante Now!” since classes began in August.“We got the piece of paper at the very beginning of the year and we talked about it,” Jenn said. “We’ve spent several class periods going over it, analyzing the text and speaking the Italian to practice.”According to instructor of Italian studies and graduate student Thomas Graff, understanding Dante is as important as being able to recite it.“We go through it in class get the cultural background, answer the questions like ‘Who’s Dante?’” Graff said.In addition, all 208 Italian language students have attended a reading workshop to develop their pronunciation of the text and become familiar with its meaning, Leone said.“We work on the rhythm, intonation, phrasing and pronunciation in those workshops.” she said. “It’s open to the public but it’s usually the classes that have been studying it so all of our language classes come in during their language period on Wednesday.”While participation in the event is part of many students’ classes, anyone can join in, Graff said. Many spectators also picked up the handouts with the text on it and recited the poems alongside the students.“You can get involved even if you aren’t in the class,” Lien said. “We give out these papers for people to join us, to read if they feel comfortable reading Italian. There’s a translation beside the Italian original script so laymen will have no trouble understanding it.”Being fluent in Italian is not necessary to experience Dante’s works, Lien said.“’The ‘Divine Comedy’ is essentially a poem,” she said. “It has that cadence and rhyme to it that you can really hear. You don’t even have to understand the language, you can just hear the beauty of how it sounds in Italian. I think it’s beautiful to anyone.”However, it is possible for those who are interested in Dante’s works to explore their meanings. After the recitations, Albert J. and Helen M. Ravarino Family Director of Dante and Italian Studies and Inaugural Academic Director of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway Theodore Cachey, associate professor of Italian Christian Moevs and Leone gave a public lecture in the library, each discussing a different aspect of Dante’s “Inferno.” According to Graff, Notre Dame makes understanding Dante’s works possible because of its professors.“The Dante professors we have are incredible, some of the best in the nation,” he said.Both Lien and Jenn said they encourage students who are curious about Dante to consider enrolling in a course focused on his works.“In my personal opinion, Dante is probably one of the greatest poets of all time,” Jenn said. “Why would you not want to listen and be exposed to that?”Tags: Dante, Divine Comedy flashmob, Italian Studies, Notre Damelast_img read more

January 17

Birds, Bees, Cows.

first_img It’s fundamental: cows are as important as bulls in improving cattle herds. Educate members of the beef industry on feeding and health programs that result in heifers reaching target weights for breeding purposes. Evaluate heifers for performance, frame characteristics, reproductive traits, carcass traits and disposition. Verify the genetics and source of good heifer characteristics for later use. Show what teamwork between farmers, scientists, county agents and the Georgia Beef Association can produce. It takes two. Cattle breeders know that, but for decades they’ve focused all theirherd-improvement efforts on the bulls.”We’ve been looking at the males for 42 years,” said Robert Stewart, aTifton, Ga., beef cattle scientist with the University of Georgia College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences. “It’s about time we looked at the females, which are asimportant or more important in cattle breeding.” First Heifer EvaluationsThis year, for the first time ever, Stewart and many others in the college andcooperating organizations evaluated heifers (female cattle that haven’t yet had a calf).They studied them for their carcass and breeding traits in a program called HERD: HeiferEvaluation and Reproductive Development.”This is the only heifer-evaluation program we know of east of the MississippiRiver,” he said. The Georgia HERD program is modeled after some in Ohio and Missouri.But because of the climate in the Southeast, the Georgia scientists had to change how theyfed the heifers.Replacing Heifers CriticalStewart said replacing heifers is just as critical as selecting bulls. But many cattlefarmers don’t know how to effectively evaluate them. So Stewart formed a 26-member team tohelp address the problem. The HERD program objectives:center_img CAES File Photo First Year a SuccessOverall, Stewart and Patsie Cannon, the research coordinator who partnered with Stewartto oversee the project, are pleased with the first year.In all, 39 farmers entered 234 heifers in the program. At the end, they sold 142heifers, including 71 born in December 1998 through February of ’99. The other half wereborn in September through November of ’98. At an April 25 sale, 31 buyers came from Georgia,Florida and Alabama. They paid an average of $883 per heifer.The program involves county agents as decision-makers and workers, Stewart said. Manyagribusinesses are partners in the program, too. “(HERD) has the potential to have avery positive effect on both purebred and commercial herds across the state,” Stewartsaid.last_img read more

December 31

Japan to reexamine policies supporting coal-fired power plant exports

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:Japan will launch a review by the end of June aimed at tightening conditions for the export of coal-fired power plants, environment minister Shinjiro Koizumi said on Tuesday.The move follows global criticism over the Japanese government’s support for building coal-fired plants in countries like Indonesia and Vietnam, as well as the roll-out of new plants in Japan.Koizumi, son of former prime minister Junichiro Koizumi and tipped as a future prime minister himself, said in December that global criticism of his country’s “addiction to coal” was hitting home, but warned he had yet to win wider support to reduce backing for fossil fuels.On Tuesday, he said the environment ministry had agreed the review with other ministries, including the finance ministry and the powerful industry ministry, which has traditionally held more sway over coal policy. The discussions will form an outline for Japan’s new infrastructure export policy to be mapped out in December, he told a news conference.Under its current policy, Japan supports coal-fired power plant projects if and when a country which needs to choose coal as a power source requests Japan to provide its highly efficient coal power technology.Japan, a big financier of new coal plants in Southeast Asia, is seen as an outlier among industrialized countries as it is the only G7 nation still building coal-fired plants at home.[Yuka Obayashi]More: Japan to tighten export policy on coal-fired power plants: minister Japan to reexamine policies supporting coal-fired power plant exportslast_img read more

December 20

Operation Martillo: Chilean oiler Almirante Montt concludes deployment

first_imgBy Dialogo August 10, 2012 SANTIAGO, Chile — Chilean navy oil tanker Almirante Montt recently wrapped up its deployment to Central American waters, where it participated in the successful international anti-trafficking multinational effort Operation Martillo, local media reported. Operation Martillo is an international operation that gathers Latin American, Western Hemisphere and European nations and the United States in an effort to curtail illicit trafficking routes on both coasts of the Central American isthmus. “We participated with the Navy of the United States and with other states that have shoreline, for the control of drug trafficking,” said Capt. Javier Erazo Wiegand, commander of the Almirante Montt. “This ship provided important logistical support to units of the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard so they could continue operating and stay on station longer [without having to port].” The professionalism and efficiency of the “Almirante Montt” and its crew was recognized by partner nations participating in Operation Martillo, Erazo Wiegand said. “At a debriefing we were told that thanks to the Chilean Navy, and particularly this ship, in the same period compared with the year prior, a 40% increase in seizures was achieved, which is very important because we’re talking about nearly 2,000 kilograms (4409 pounds) more,” he said.last_img read more