May 12

Opt-out

first_imgOpt-outOn 10 Dec 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Having a say in Europe We have received an enormous response from readers to our Working TimeOpt-Out Survey. The Employment Lawyers Association and Personnel Today havebeen asked by the European Commission to research the potential impact of theopt-out’s removal. See full coverage of the results in January. Related posts:No related photos.last_img

May 12

Unison vote may lead to Euro-style strike action

first_imgUnison vote may lead to Euro-style strike actionOn 24 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. The UK’s biggest union took a step closer to continental-style collectiveindustrial action, after its members voted in favour of changes to its nationalpolicy. Unison, which represents more than 1.3 million workers, overwhelminglypassed the amendments, which could lead to local government, NHS and teachingstaff striking simultaneously. The vote, at its annual conference in Brighton last week, means the union willnow be able to co-ordinate action across different parts of the public sector,with a more harmonised approach to pay bargaining and strike action. A Unison spokesperson said the motion would mean a more consistent andcoherent approach to agreements and industrial action. “It will ensure one sector doesn’t get left behind, but will also allowus to make the most of our broad base. If we weren’t getting any movement onpay claims in different sectors, we could then have action across them,”he said. Unison’s general secretary, Dave Prentis, warned the Government that it muststart to back public sector reforms with more investment, or face theconsequences. “If the local government pay commission is not funded, if the reformsin schools are not funded, if Agenda for Change is not funded, then we willtake strike action again,” he said. However, the union’s stance was criticised by the Chartered Institute ofPersonnel and Development for being too antagonistic and potentially damaging. Mike Emmott, the institute’s employee relations expert, said it raised thestakes and could cause serious divisions. “Assuming they get co-ordinatedaction, it would precipitate further gaps between the Government and theunions. “It’s born from a loss of patience and would be bad for the generalpublic and the unions because, as we saw in the fire dispute, no governmentwanting to be re-elected could back down,” he said. By Ross Wighamwww.unison.org.uk Comments are closed. last_img read more

May 12

People focus boosts bank’s fortunes

first_img Comments are closed. People focus boosts bank’s fortunesOn 5 Oct 2004 in Personnel Today Thefocus of Barclays’ chief executive on people policies helped the bank recoverfrom its financial woes of the late 1990s, according to its most senior HRprofessional.MattBarrett was brought in by Barclays in 1999. The bank had fallen to 22nd place inthe global banking market from a high of fourth position, and the previouschief executive had just been fired in the middle of a board meeting.HisHR background meant he was aware that focusing on people and culture was thekey to turning Barclays around, said Gary Dibb, chief administration officer.”Forthe first two years, Matt was on a constant circuit talking to employees,”he told delegates at the Economist HR Directors’ European Summit. “If anemployee had an idea that worked, they would get a personalised letter or phonecall from the chief executive.”Barrett’sfirst target of cutting costs by £1bn meant that HR spend was slashed by 39 percent. But he also changed the culture. Barclays consisted of four highlyautonomous businesses -retail banking, Barclays Capital, Barclaycard andPrivate Banking – which rarely communicated with each other.”Wemade big changes to the 10-strong executive committee,” said Dibb. “There was also lotsof movement between businesses, breaking down the silos.” Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

May 12

Massive $9.2M townhouse tops Brooklyn’s luxury contracts

first_img280 Washington Avenue (Douglas Elliman)The most expensive townhouse that went into contract last week is big, even by Brooklyn standards.Thirty-five homes in the borough asking over $2 million went into contract last week, according to Compass’ weekly report. Of those, 18 were condos and 17 were townhouses.The total of those asking prices was $108 million, up from $97.5 million the week before.A 10,000-square-foot townhouse at 280 Washington Avenue in Clinton Hill topped the list. The four-story home last had an asking price of $9.2 million, or $920 per square foot.The seven-bedroom, five-bathroom house sits on a 200-foot full block lot and features stained glass windows, a home theater and a temperature controlled wine cellar. It was built in 1887 and has since been restored.ADVERTISEMENTRead morePark Slope townhouses top Brooklyn’s luxury contracts $14M house topped Brooklyn’s luxury listings last week Brooklyn’s luxury market cooled last week Tags Full Name* Message* A 6,900-square-foot townhouse at 104 Prospect Park West in Park Slope was the second highest contract signed last week. It was priced at $6.5 million, or $943 per square foot. The early 20th century home has five bedrooms and three bathrooms.Across all deals, the average discount dropped slightly to 3 percent last week and the median asking price was about $2.7 million. The average price per square foot was $1,222.Contact Cordilia James Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlink Email Address* brooklynLuxury Real EstateNYC Luxury MarketResidential Real Estatetownhouse marketlast_img read more

May 9

Interannual variability beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica

first_imgAs a result of their importance in the production of Antarctic Bottom Water, processes over the Antarctic continental shelf have a strong impact on the global ocean. Some of the ice shelves that cover much of the continental shelf are thought to play a significant role in the production of AABW, particularly in the southern Weddell Sea[Foldvik and Gammelsrød, 1988]. The impact of the ocean on ice shelves is of interest from a glaciological perspective also, as ice shelves form the seaward boundary of much of the Antarctic Ice Sheet.last_img read more

May 9

Adaptations to hydrothermal vent life in Kiwa tyleri, a new species of yeti crab from the East Scotia Ridge, Antarctica

first_imgHydrothermal vents in the Southern Ocean are the physiologically most isolated chemosynthetic environments known. Here, we describe Kiwa tyleri sp. nov., the first species of yeti crab known from the Southern Ocean. Kiwa tyleri belongs to the family Kiwaidae and is the visually dominant macrofauna of two known vent sites situated on the northern and southern segments of the East Scotia Ridge (ESR). The species is known to depend on primary productivity by chemosynthetic bacteria and resides at the warm-eurythermal vent environment for most of its life; its short-range distribution away from vents (few metres) is physiologically constrained by the stable, cold waters of the surrounding Southern Ocean. Kiwa tylerihas been shown to present differential life history adaptations in response to this contrasting thermal environment. Morphological adaptations specific to life in warm-eurythermal waters, as found on – or in close proximity of – vent chimneys, are discussed in comparison with adaptations seen in the other two known members of the family (K. hirsuta, K. puravida), which show a preference for low temperature chemosynthetic environments.last_img read more

May 9

Is current management of the Antarctic krill fishery in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean precautionary?

first_imgThis paper explains the management of the Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) fishery in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, and current knowledge about the state of the regional krill stock. In this region, krill fishing is permitted in an area of approximately 3.5 million km2 which is divided into four subareas (labelled Subareas 48.1 to 48.4) for management and reporting purposes. The effective regional catch limit (or ‘trigger level’), established in 1991, is 0.62 million tonnes year–1, equivalent to ~1% of the regional biomass estimated in 2000. Each subarea has also had its own catch limit, between 0.093 and 0.279 million tonnes year–1, since 2009. There is some evidence for a decline in the abundance of krill in the 1980s, but no evidence of a further decline in recent decades. Local-scale monitoring programs have been established in three of the subareas to monitor krill biomass in survey grids covering between 10 000 and 125 000 km2. Cautious extrapolation from these local monitoring programs provides conservative estimates of the regional biomass in recent years. This suggests that fishing at the trigger level would be equivalent to a long-term exploitation rate (annual catch divided by biomass) of <7%, which is below the 9.3% level considered appropriate to maintain the krill stock and support krill predators.Subarea catch limits exceed 9.3% of conservatively estimated subarea biomass in upto 20% of years due to high variability in krill biomass indices. The actual exploitationrate in each subarea has remained <3% because annual catches have been <50% of thetrigger level since 1991. Comparison with the 9.3% reference exploitation rate suggeststhat current management is precautionary at the regional scale. The subarea catch limitshelp prevent excessive concentration of catch at the subarea scale. Finer-scale managementmight be necessary to manage the risk of adverse impacts which might occur as aresult of concentrated fishing in sensitive areas or climate change. Frequent assessmentof the krill stock will enhance CCAMLR’s ability to manage these risks. Continuing thelocal monitoring programs will provide valuable information on krill variability, but moreinformation is required on how the monitored biomass relates to biomass at the subareaand regional scales.last_img read more

May 8

Prep Sports Schedule: 3/30

first_imgMarch 29, 2018 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Schedule: 3/30 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBoys SoccerRegion 17APA West Valley 4 Wasatch Academy 2SoftballNon-RegionManti 16 American Fork 8Baseball Non-RegionHurricane 7 Richfield 4 Brad Jamescenter_img Tags: Baseball/Boys Soccer/Juab/Manti/Piute/Richfield/Softball/South Sevier/Wasatch Academy Written bylast_img

May 8

SUU Men’s Tennis Adds Spanish Export

first_img Brad James Written by Tags: Division II/Juan Erro/Sadhaf Pucher/SUU Men’s Tennis May 29, 2018 /Sports News – Local SUU Men’s Tennis Adds Spanish Export FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailCEDAR CITY, Utah-Tuesday, the Southern Utah University men’s tennis program added a Spanish national to the fold per a statement from head coach Sadhaf Pucher.Juan Erro, from San Sebastian, Spain, comes to Cedar City from Division II Hawaii Pacific. Erro, who will be a junior, went 14-9 while playing in #4 and #5 singles for the Sharks.During his freshman campaign, Erro went 16-3 playing singles and 17-5 as a doubles partner. His freshman season also saw him as part of a team that qualified for the NCAA Division II tournament.Pucher spoke highly of his new player, saying “Winners find a way to win and I see that in Juan.”During his prep career in Spain, Erro was a Marca U16 finalist, won the U16 Mutua Madrid Open and ranked 15th overall in Spanish U16 play.last_img read more

May 8

Dixie State Baseball Hosts Colorado Christian To Conclude Home Season

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailST. GEORGE, Utah-Friday through Sunday, Dixie State baseball (28-14, 18-10 in Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference play) concludes its home schedule at Bruce Hurst Field by hosting Colorado Christian (12-29, 7-21 in RMAC play). The Cougars are led by senior utility man Scotty Ingle and junior outfielder Carter Mossey with batting averages of .309 and .308 respectively. Junior infielder Jake Engel (a team-best 12 home runs along with 41 RBI) has been Dixie State’s most consistent offensive player throughout the season. Sunday is Senior Day for 10 Trailblazers, outfielders Brody Clifford, Kade Cloward and Kaid Urban, infielders Wyatt Branch, Bryce Feist and Joe Raymond and pitchers Kaivon Kealoha, Chandler Greenfield, Jayden Murray and Tyler Rosas. Tags: Alex Ginn/Brayden Bonner/Brody Clifford/Bruce Hurst Field/Bryce Feist/Carter Mossey/Chandler Greenfield/Colorado Christian/Dixie State Baseball/Hunter Hays/Jack Gonzales/Jake Engel/Jayden Murray/Joe Raymond/Kade Cloward/Kaid Urban/Kaivon Kealoha/Matt Kimura/Preston Hannay/Sam Gallegos/Scotty Ingle/Tyler Hollow/Tyler Rosas/Tyson Fisher/Wyatt Branch Redshirt junior outfielder/first baseman Sam Gallegos has four home runs on the season to lead Colorado Christian. The Trailblazers lead the Cougars 4-0 all-time Senior right-handed pitcher Alex Ginn has the best record on the staff with 4-4 and also has amassed a team-best 48 strikeouts for the Cougars. Friday, the Trailblazers will go with Murray (8-2, 3.80 ERA), Saturday with Preston Hannay (6-3) and Jack Gonzales (5-2) and Sunday with Brayden Bonner (2-1, 3.20 ERA).center_img The Cougars are led in RBI by junior infielder Hunter Hays and redshirt junior infielder Matt Kimura (22 RBI apiece). Dixie State is led in batting average by freshman infielder Tyson Fisher (.401) while he is also solid in other areas with 7 home runs and 36 RBI. This series follows the same format as other RMAC series, a single game on Friday and Sunday with a doubleheader on Saturday. Sophomore second baseman Tyler Hollow leads the Trailblazers in RBI with 41. Brad James April 25, 2019 /Sports News – Local Dixie State Baseball Hosts Colorado Christian To Conclude Home Season Written bylast_img read more