May 2

CAL RIPKEN AWARDS

first_imgCAL RIPKEN AWARDS — At our recently held 21st Cal Ripken baseball awards ceremony, both Danny Izquierdo and Kyle Peterson were honored for winning awards. Danny is the Prep League MVP and Kyle is the Major league MVP. Danny played for MJ Desmond’s while Kyle played for Pizza Masters.last_img

April 21

SPACE TO GROW

first_imgA move from its long-established town centre home to a substantially larger bakery on the outskirts of Falkirk has provided retail and wholesale baker Mathiesons not only with “a totally compliant food manufacturing environment” but also with a completely new perspective on the marketplace.The 34 outlet retail baker, which also supplies wholesale customers across Scotland, has moved out of its former 18,000sq ft Williamson Street bakery. Space there was at a distinct premium and opportunities for new product development (NPD) were consequently limited. But the company’s new 47,000sq ft premises present no such constraints. “This gives us a chance to raise our heads – to look at the marketplace and at the opportunities out there,” declares MD George Stevenson. “That will drive the way we look at NPD.” However, the first priority for the family business is to assimilate the 100 staff into their new home. “We do have to bed in a lot of new standards and processes, because it’s a big change for everybody,” he observes. The transfer of operations from Williamson Street began in February and was completed during early March, although preparations had been taking place since the site was first identified in 2004. “As soon as I saw the building, I thought ‘this will work’,” recalls Mr Stevenson. Architects focused on ways of achieving regulatory compliance but, in broad terms, the building’s existing template fitted with Mathiesons’ own needs, he says.Lifting the loadThe site on Falkirk’s Central Business Park was formerly occupied by data storage device manufacturer Exabyte. The bakery firm took it over in August of last year and orchestrated a couple of significant changes to the fabric of the building, including the addition of a loading bay with docks for six vehicles and sufficient space to unload under cover. The loading/unloading area at Williamson Street was “very tight” and so this represents “a big step forward”, according to Mr Stevenson.The other major change was to incorporate into the internal design a corridor that completely encircles the main bakery production area. As a result, deliveries from outside can be effected without anyone having to step into the main production core. There is even a specific door through which supplies of meat enter the production area. “To my mind, it’s as good as you can get (in terms of segregation),” states Mr Stevenson.This “inner and outer” approach to the bakery design also means that a piece of equipment requiring maintenance or repair can be transferred to its own special room to avoid disturbing or compromising the production process. Furthermore, a room has been set aside on the outer band of the building for the accumulation of packaging and food wastes. These can now be collected directly from outside. For Mathiesons, the move to new premises has underlined the extent to which space – or rather, the lack of it – had been the company’s enemy at Williamson Street. For example, the fully-racked stores area at Central Business Park offers more than 20 times the capacity that was available at the previous bakery. Mr Stevenson comments: “We didn’t have any racking to speak of at the other bakery – it was all storage on pallets – so this will make such a difference.” Whereas, previously, suppliers delivered to individual shops two or three times each week, they will now be able to make a single delivery in bulk to the bakery for onward supply to its 25 retail outlets, which are spread across the centre and east of Scotland. The change will mean a significant reduction in distribution costs.The luxury of space is also apparent within the production core of the bakery. For example, Mathiesons has been able to afford its confectionery operation a separate and far larger area with dedicated wash-up section and blast freezer transferred from the Williamson Street bakery. Sandwich ingredients are directed from the stores into a holding room, ready to be drawn off by sandwich-making staff as required. And with food safety in mind, personnel involved in making sandwiches, cream products and confectionery have their own changing rooms to reflect the products’ higher-risk status. The extra office space on both floors of the building has enabled Mathiesons to incorporate an off-the-job craft training centre kitted out with some small items of equipment. Mr Stevenson acknowledges the merits of on-the-job training, but believes a training room separate from the main production area “is essential for effective delivery of underpinning knowledge”. Inherited wealthAs well as the space available to Mathiesons at Central Business Park, the company has also reaped some benefit from the sensitivity of the production processes operated by its predecessor at the site, Exabyte. “Thanks to the previous tenant having a requirement for constant control of air temperature and humidity levels, we have inherited a very good system,” observes Mr Stevenson. Another plus point is undoubtedly the bakery’s location – turn right after the nearby Kincardine Bridge, which crosses the Firth of Forth, and you are in the midst of Central Scotland’s motorway network. “It’s a big advantage for us in terms of expansion and distribution,” says Mr Stevenson. Mathiesons has set up a retail outlet at the plant to attract trade not only from the road but also from the business park itself where, for example, a nearby call centre employs around 750 people. The shop is sited next to the bakery’s canteen and will also cater for staff needs. According to Mr Stevenson, the decision to establish this new and substantially larger bakery represents “a commitment from the family that there is a strong future for baking in Scotland”. It is also a massive commitment to the company’s 450-plus workforce spread across the bakery, 25 retail outlets and nine restaurants/cafés stretching from Elgin in the north to Gretna in the south. Indeed, the move is thought likely to create up to 24 new jobs.Including site purchase, the firm has invested a total of more than £4m in the project, with around £600,000 being ploughed into an array of new equipment including three mixers, three retarder provers, a prover, and four Sveba Dahlen ovens. “We went for new ovens because of the age of the models at Williamson Street and because of the cost of dismantling and transferring them,” explains Mr Stevenson. The company has also bought a new Rondo Doge puff pastry machine for savouries, all of which are dispatched frozen for bake-off at the retail outlets. From the old bakery, the company has moved across a reel oven, roll plant, bread plant, hot plates and a doughnut maker. For the moment, production will focus on those goods for which the firm has already established a reputation. Noting that its top seller is the Scotch pie, Mr Stevenson adds with pride: “We have won more gold medals than any other baker in the world for our Scotch pies.” Sweet and savouryThe firm’s other leading savoury products include bridies, sausage rolls, cheese & onion pies and steak bakes, while its vanguard confectionery products include éclairs and vanilla slices. Mathiesons is also known for its range of speciality breads, rolls, cakes and morning goods. One product area likely to benefit more than most from the move to new premises is sandwiches. Mr Stevenson explains.The Williamson Street bakery served the family firm for over seven decades and provided director Donald Mathieson with his first job on leaving bakery college well over 40 years ago. “There are bound to be memories and a sense of nostalgia,” says Mr Stevenson, “but we have no regrets about the move. The new bakery re-sets the bar in terms of standards, operating procedures and working environment – the conditions for producing quality products.”Company turnover of around £8.5m per annum had been constrained by the size and shape of the Williamson Street bakery. Mr Stevenson asserts: “This move allows us to get back on the growth trail.”- Coinciding with its move, the firm has changed its name from R. Mathieson and Sons to Mathiesons Bakeries.last_img read more

March 2

The Music Of New Orleans & Prince To Be Celebrated At New York City’s Sony Hall This October

first_imgNew Orleans is arguably the mecca of music in America. A cultural melting pot, the Crescent City has been at the forefront of various musical styles and evolutions, including ragtime, jazz, blues, funk, brass band/second line, Afro-Cuban, rhythm & blues, rock ‘n’ roll,  and more since the late 1800s. Being one of the main port cities of early America, the diversity of cultures from the West Indies, Africa, Cuba, and Latin American led to a literal musical gumbo of sorts, if you will—influence upon influence upon influence coalescing into something that is strictly NOLA.This fall, three generations of local legends are coming together to present Take Me To The River New Orleans, a musical performance celebrating the musical culture, heritage, and legacy of The Big Easy, which will make its way to New York City’s Sony Hall on Thursday, October 25th (purchase tickets here). The tour will precede the Martin Shore documentary Take Me To The River New Orleans (the follow-up to 2014’s Take Me To The River Memphis), which examines the rich, deep history of New Orleans music, its evolution, and the many iconic musicians that have graced the world stage. The musicians taking part in this historic performance consist of Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Dumpstaphunk’s Ivan and Ian Neville (descendants of the royal Neville bloodline), iconic bassist George Porter Jr. of The Meters, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Lost Bayou Ramblers Duo, the 79ers Gang, and Terence Higgins. For any true music fan, this is a can’t-miss performance.Take Me To The River – New Orleans Live! Trailer[Video: National Show 2]Also coming to the recently opened Sony Hall will be a two-night run on October 11th and 12th from The Revolution, Prince’s original band (purchase tickets here). Formed in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1979 by the Purple One himself, The Revolution became one of the most successful acts of the 1980s, selling over 16 million albums with the help of #1 albums such as Purple Rain and Around the World in a Day. With the sudden and unfortunate passing of their legendary friend, the group played several hometown shows at First Avenue in honor of Prince. The show continues to go on, and The Revolution will head to NYC for a celebration of the power of music and the spirit of love. An obviously difficult and emotional decision to return to the stage after the passing of Prince, guitarist and vocalist Wendy Melvoin explains, “We’ve been really quiet, and we did that consciously because we were grieving and didn’t want to be disrespectful. But the fans wanted the chance to feel the energy so we just want to give it back letting them experience what we were as a band for Prince.” Drummer Bobby Z. relates, “Prince said that music is medicine. … People need it, and we need it, and we can make it as authentic as we can. In honor of him, we’ll give it everything we’ve got.” The Revolution (ft. Stokley Williams) – “When Doves Cry”  – 4/28/17[Video: cmputrbluu]Tickets for both Take Me To The River on Thursday, October 25th, and The Revolution’s two-night run on October 11th and 12th are currently on-sale. Check out the links below for ticket and event information. For additional information and event updates, join the FB Event pages.October 11th – The Revolution: Tickets / FB EventOctober 12th – The Revolution: Tickets / FB EventOctober 25th – Take Me To The River: Tickets / FB Eventlast_img read more

March 1

Fighting poverty, by design

first_imgIn the summer of 2007, Harvard architecture student Michael Murphy moved to an abandoned military camp on a remote hilltop in Rwanda. For the next six months he lived in a converted tribunal building, conferring daily with doctors, nurses, patients, and neighbors. The mission: build a new hospital with local labor and materials, using design concepts that prevent the transmission of airborne disease.In place of drawn curtains, closed windows, and unventilated corridors would be cross-ventilation systems, secluded wards with interior courtyards, and rooms sweetened by natural breezes. And in place of using outside contractors would be training for a local labor force eager to pull itself out of poverty.Murphy — who graduates today (May 26) with a master’s in architecture from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design — eventually spent 15 months in Rwanda trying out a constellation of new ideas: that architecture can play a role in reducing poverty; that good design can influence health outcomes; and that the work of construction can build dignity, a skilled workforce, and even hope in places marked by poverty and tragedy.“Architecture is an expansive field,” he said, but too often it has been narrowly considered, ignoring the social justice inherent in appropriate design.To explore and execute these emerging ideas, Murphy and Marika Shioiri-Clark, M.Arch. 1 ’11, founded the nonprofit MASS Design Group four years ago. Today it’s a buzzing firm of 16 architects and designers — many of them Harvard graduates — working on clinics, schools, and hospitals in the developing world. The main office is in Boston’s South End, where founding partner Alan Ricks, M.Arch. 1 ’10, is creative director and David Saladik, M.Arch. 1 ’10, is chief operating officer. Elizabeth Timme, M.Arch. 2 ’10, runs the new Los Angeles office. Seven other staffers are based in Kigali, Rwanda’s capital.Michael Murphy (pictured) and Marika Shioiri-Clark, M.Arch. 1 ’11, founded the nonprofit MASS Design Group four years ago. Today it’s a buzzing firm of 16 architects and designers — many of them Harvard graduates — working on clinics, schools, and hospitals in the developing world.Butaro Hospital, finished earlier this year, is a place where dignity was constructed along with walls and walkways, said Murphy. Of the 1,400 local laborers taking part, some were trained in masonry, carpentry, and other skills that he said are already improving the local economy and infrastructure.The day Butaro was dedicated, Feb. 24, was the most powerful of his life, said Murphy. It was “proof of concept,” he said, “a new way of thinking about architecture’s social responsibility.”MASS Design Group this year will add two other components to that new way of thinking. One is research to engage public health scholars in proving that good design is part of good health outcomes. Another is education. Most of the seven MASS Design Group architects in Rwanda teach at the Kigali Institute of Science and Technology, where former GSD visiting faculty member Sierra Bainbridge directs the architecture program — the country’s first. Said Murphy, “We want Rwandans to rebuild Rwanda.”Murphy called his path to Harvard “circuitous.” He studied literature at the University of Chicago as a way to investigate politics, anthropology, and human rights. After graduation in 2002, he spent two years in the New York City book industry. By 2005, Murphy was trying out freelance journalism in Cape Town, South Africa, where he had lived as a student five years before. In the interval, broad open lawns had given way to high walls and barbed wire — changing realities that made him realize architects could help in emerging economies, or do harm by ignoring the power of context.Murphy developed a sensitivity to culture, identity, and social justice growing up in Poughkeepsie, a city in New York’s Hudson Valley where poverty and crime ate away at a diverse social fabric. Literature and travel completed the job, and by the time he entered Harvard in the fall of 2006, said Murphy, “I was ready to explore.”Late last month, he was busy finishing his thesis, an exploration of Space & Society magazine (1976-2000), a publication that developed a rich debate over social responsibilities — in a quest for what its editor Giancarlo de Carlo called “the whole architect.” The same identity crisis has gripped the profession in the 21st century, said Murphy. In answer, MASS Design Group hopes to pave a way to designs that are contemporary, contextual, humble, and descriptive of expanded roles for architecture.In July, he will be in Rwanda to help dedicate the Girubuntu School, a 10-building campus on a Kigali hilltop. Spatially segregated by grades, it will serve 300 primary school children. “I love this work so much,” said Murphy, “that I don’t have much of a life outside of it.”last_img read more

January 26

Saint Mary’s hosts panel on “The Handmaid’s Tale” in anticipation of the Christian Culture Lecture

first_imgTo prepare for the upcoming Christian Culture Lecture, Saint Mary’s hosted a discussion about “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood on Tuesday.Speakers included Phyllis Kaminski of the religious studies and gender and women’s studies departments, Ann Marie Short of the English department and Laura Williamson Ambrose of the humanistic studies department. The three professors reflected on their own interpretations of the novel.Ambrose discussed the novel’s genre. She said she does not believe the novel belongs to science fiction or feminist genres and that Atwood resists labels.Instead, the novel belongs in the speculative fiction genre, Ambrose said. This genre is particularly scary for many readers because it is so realistic, she added.“Speculative fiction says this could maybe happen tomorrow,” Ambrose said. “It’s more frightening and provocative than science fiction and a distant galaxy, far, far away. … Speculative fiction makes the work of ignoring a little bit harder.”Kaminski first read the novel as a doctoral student in Canada. She said she thinks Atwood’s Canadian nationality has a large influence on the novel, and helps Atwood look at the United States with a critical eye.“Atwood set this [novel] in the United States from the perspective of someone part of a country that was considered lesser than, or other than,” she said. “She sees what happens when we’re superficial and don’t try to move beyond ignorance and ignoring. That’s a real blind spot in the United States. She’s standing north of the border when she thinks and writes, and she sees the differences [between the U.S. and Canada].”Short said she also thinks Atwood’s Canadian influence impacted how race is presented in the novel. In “The Handmaid’s Tale,” the race of each character is not mentioned.“The novel is not explicit about race, but it’s clearly a racist society,” Short said. “Is it so obvious that an American world would be racist? It’s not even worth being explicit. It’s a given.”Short spoke about her experiences reading the novel. She said she has read it three times, and her first time reading it was in the ’90s at age 16.She said at that time, it was not very relatable and felt like science fiction. However, when Hulu announced the television series based on the book, Short returned to the novel. She then read it again to prepare to teach it this semester.Short said the subject of race in the novel stood out to her, during her second and third times reading the book. In the novel, there are elements of a racist society, Short said. The housekeepers are described as dark skinned, and there is anti-semitic rhetoric in Gilead, for instance. “It is very clear that Gilead is racist, white supremacist society, but it never says that explicitly,” she said.The Hulu series practices color-blind casting, Short said, and casts black actors into roles that would probably be white characters in the novel. She said this conveys the message that everyone’s experience is the same in Gilead, regardless of race.This portrayal of the novel and race is problematic, Short said.“It erases the issue of racism and says we are in a post-racial society,” she said.Short questioned how new generations will interpret “The Handmaid’s Tale” as they watch the Hulu series instead of reading the book.“In this moment of Hulu and the questions and critiques of race, what is our responsibility with this novel now?” she said. “In the show, something felt off, and I realized it was the issue of race. How will people who only watch the Hulu series interpret the story?”Tags: literature, race, the handmaid’s talelast_img read more

January 18

100-Year-Old Dies Of COVID-19 Infection In Cattaraugus County

first_imgCDC / Alissa Eckert, MS LITTLE VALLEY – A 100-year-old woman living in Cattaraugus County has died due to COVID-19 complications.The Cattaraugus County Health Department on Thursday reported the death, the 19th since the outbreak began.Officials also announced nine new cases, including seven women and two men.One of the new cases is a health care worker and five people reporting direct contact with another person positive with COVID-19. Currently, 111 cases are active with 518 total. As of the update, 296 residents are in either mandatory or precautionary quarantine. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

December 20

Summit in Colombia Focuses on Global Drug Trafficking Fight

first_imgClose cooperation between Colombia and the U.S. is strengthening the fight against international drug trafficking and other illegal enterprises. “To this we have had to strengthen the capacities of all our forces — intelligence, air mobility, special operations, and especially our credibility,” Pinzón said. The conference was an excellent opportunity for Military and police officials from Central and South America to gather and exchange ideas on how nations in the region can work together to combat international drug trafficking and other transnational criminal enterprises that the region shares. In line with the theme of this year’s IDEC, “Transformation of the Drug Phenomenon: A Global Challenge,” Pinzón laid out the increasing need for international cooperation in the fight against narcotrafficking and other criminal enterprises. Though it isn’t as prevalent today as it was in 2000, authorities must remain vigilant in their battle against the “curse” of international narcotrafficking. The close ties between the two countries was underscored during the conference, when Colombian government authorities held a ceremony to highlight the donation by U.S. officials of six high-speed interceptor boats from Safe Boats International to strengthen the Colombian National Navy’s interdiction efforts along the Colombian Pacific coastline. Illicit trafficking as efficient as FedEx Colombia receives high speed boats from the U.S. In line with the theme of this year’s IDEC, “Transformation of the Drug Phenomenon: A Global Challenge,” Pinzón laid out the increasing need for international cooperation in the fight against narcotrafficking and other criminal enterprises. Though it isn’t as prevalent today as it was in 2000, authorities must remain vigilant in their battle against the “curse” of international narcotrafficking. The event included officials from the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and the United Nations (UN). The -three-day conference, which was organized by the Colombian National Police, began June 2 with remarks by Colombian Chief of Police General Rodolfo Palomino. Illicit trafficking as efficient as FedEx In another cooperative security agreement, the Navies of Colombia, Brazil, and Peru are working together in BRACOLPER Naval 2015, a Military operation to combat transnational criminal activities in the Amazon region shared by the three countries. The event included officials from the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and the United Nations (UN). The -three-day conference, which was organized by the Colombian National Police, began June 2 with remarks by Colombian Chief of Police General Rodolfo Palomino. “What we need, more than a war, is a complete package of intelligent, well-designed, well-executed, people-centered measures,” said Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos. He has assigned outgoing Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón with developing a new strategy to combat drug trafficking in different and more efficient ways. “Colombia has made great progress precisely because we have faced the threats posed by drug trafficking and related crime head on,” Pinzón said. In May, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said he was reassigning Pinzón to the post of ambassador in Washington, D.C., and that current ambassador to the U.S. Luis Carlos Villegas is replacing Pinzón as defense minister. “What we need, more than a war, is a complete package of intelligent, well-designed, well-executed, people-centered measures,” said Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos. He has assigned outgoing Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón with developing a new strategy to combat drug trafficking in different and more efficient ways. This means that Military and law enforcement authorities must attack every link in the chain of the illegal drug trade, from the cultivation and production of illegal drugs to money laundering, drug trafficking, and related crimes. “These boats are additional resources to defeat crime and drug trafficking in Colombia, which is our main goal together with our ally, the United States,” Pinzón said. “The boats that we received today give us an increased capacity to remove tons of cocaine from drug traffickers,” he added. The vessels will be used to intercept vessels suspected of trafficking narcotics, weapons, and other illicit items. This means that Military and law enforcement authorities must attack every link in the chain of the illegal drug trade, from the cultivation and production of illegal drugs to money laundering, drug trafficking, and related crimes. The close ties between the two countries was underscored during the conference, when Colombian government authorities held a ceremony to highlight the donation by U.S. officials of six high-speed interceptor boats from Safe Boats International to strengthen the Colombian National Navy’s interdiction efforts along the Colombian Pacific coastline. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) is one of the main criminal groups which engages in narcotrafficking. The FARC uses proceeds from drug trafficking to finance its terrorist attacks against the civilian population, the Military, and police forces. The U.S. government and its Armed Forces work hand-in-hand with Colombia to fight drug trafficking, terrorism, weapons smuggling, human trafficking and other transnational criminal enterprises. “We rely heavily on our international partners [across the region],” Gen. Kelly said. “Illicit trafficking threatens every single one of our countries, using a vast system of pathways to move hundreds of tons of drugs, tens of thousands of people, and countless weapons into and out of the United States, Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia,” said General John F. Kelly, commander of USSOUTHCOM. “And they do so with an efficiency, payload, and gross profit that FedEx would envy.” By Dialogo June 16, 2015 The nature of international drug trafficking has changed, Gen. Kelly said. “Illicit trafficking threatens every single one of our countries, using a vast system of pathways to move hundreds of tons of drugs, tens of thousands of people, and countless weapons into and out of the United States, Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia,” said General John F. Kelly, commander of USSOUTHCOM. “And they do so with an efficiency, payload, and gross profit that FedEx would envy.” From cocaine cowboys to drug corporations “To this we have had to strengthen the capacities of all our forces — intelligence, air mobility, special operations, and especially our credibility,” Pinzón said. “Gone are the days of the ‘cocaine cowboys’ — we’re now dealing with ‘cocaine corporations’ who have franchises all over the world,” the SOUTHCOM commander said. The U.S. government and its Armed Forces work hand-in-hand with Colombia to fight drug trafficking, terrorism, weapons smuggling, human trafficking and other transnational criminal enterprises. “We rely heavily on our international partners [across the region],” Gen. Kelly said. From cocaine cowboys to drug corporations The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) is one of the main criminal groups which engages in narcotrafficking. The FARC uses proceeds from drug trafficking to finance its terrorist attacks against the civilian population, the Military, and police forces. “Gone are the days of the ‘cocaine cowboys’ — we’re now dealing with ‘cocaine corporations’ who have franchises all over the world,” the SOUTHCOM commander said. Cartagena, Colombia hosted the 32nd International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC) in June, with close to 400 representatives from more than 120 countries working together to find new ways to fight and dismantle transnational criminal organizations and terrorist groups. Colombia receives high speed boats from the U.S. Cartagena, Colombia hosted the 32nd International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC) in June, with close to 400 representatives from more than 120 countries working together to find new ways to fight and dismantle transnational criminal organizations and terrorist groups. The nature of international drug trafficking has changed, Gen. Kelly said. Close cooperation between Colombia and the U.S. is strengthening the fight against international drug trafficking and other illegal enterprises. “Colombia has made great progress precisely because we have faced the threats posed by drug trafficking and related crime head on,” Pinzón said. In May, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said he was reassigning Pinzón to the post of ambassador in Washington, D.C., and that current ambassador to the U.S. Luis Carlos Villegas is replacing Pinzón as defense minister. “These boats are additional resources to defeat crime and drug trafficking in Colombia, which is our main goal together with our ally, the United States,” Pinzón said. “The boats that we received today give us an increased capacity to remove tons of cocaine from drug traffickers,” he added. The vessels will be used to intercept vessels suspected of trafficking narcotics, weapons, and other illicit items. The conference was an excellent opportunity for Military and police officials from Central and South America to gather and exchange ideas on how nations in the region can work together to combat international drug trafficking and other transnational criminal enterprises that the region shares. In another cooperative security agreement, the Navies of Colombia, Brazil, and Peru are working together in BRACOLPER Naval 2015, a Military operation to combat transnational criminal activities in the Amazon region shared by the three countries. it’s good…. CONGRATULATIONS TO CLAUDIA GURISATI, FOR BRINGING SANTOS TO JUDGMENT, THAT’S HOW JOURNALISM IS DONE.SHE IS A PROGRAM DIRECTORlast_img read more

December 18

North Bay Shore Crash Leaves Pedestrian Dead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 59-year-old pedestrian was fatally struck by a car in North Bay Shore on Monday morning.Suffolk County police said the victim was crossing Fifth Avenue when he was struck by a northbound Honda Civic shortly after 6 a.m.The victim and the driver, 21-year-old Marlon Ordonez of Brentwood, were taken to Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, where the victim was pronounced dead shortly later and the driver was treated for minor injuries.The victim’s identity was not immediately released.Third Squad detectives impounded the car, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information to call them at 631-854-8352.last_img read more

December 18

Bay Shore Man Admits to Fatal Shooting

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Bay Shore man admitted to fatally shooting a 26-year-old man behind a shuttered K-Mart in Middle Island last year.Michael Dirkschneider pleaded guilty Friday to second-degree murder at Suffolk County court.Authorities have said the 31-year-old gunman shot Alexander Incorvia with a .45 caliber handgun on March 29, 2016.A woman walking her dog found the victim’s body in a wooded area behind the vacant store four days later, the same day that Suffolk County police found the murder weapon on the killer’s dresser, according to investigators.Dirkschneider has been held without bail since he was indicted last year. Judge Richard Ambro is scheduled to sentence Dirkschneider on May 23.last_img read more

December 18

Get ready for generation Z: the member of the future

first_img 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr In the next few years, a new generation of consumers will enter the marketplace, changing the rules for all of us.Known as Generation Z, this group of post-millennial consumers born sometime after 1995 has lived in a world quite different from that of past generations. And they are about to enter the market in mass.According to a recent article in Fast Company, Generation Z makes up 25 percent of the U.S. population, and will represent 40 percent of all consumers by 2020. All of which means, in order for credit unions to remain viable 10 to 15 years from now, they need to understand just what makes these young consumers tick.“When you are talking about Generation Z, you are talking about individuals that have never known life without the Internet,” said Terrence Griffin, chief information officer for CO-OP Financial Services. “Their lives have been constructed around the concept of availability. For example, when a child or teen today wakes up at 3 a.m. and wants to watch Nickelodeon, Nickelodeon is on. If they want to download and pay for an Xbox game at midnight, no problem.  They live in a 24/7 culture, and credit unions that want to attract these consumers will need to follow suit.” continue reading »last_img read more