January 26

Circle K hosts extravaganza

first_imgNotre Dame students gathered to learn about service opportunities and to kick back as they kick started the new semester with the Notre Dame Circle K’s Service Extravaganza in the LaFortune Student Center ballroom Sunday. The group started with full force as students wrote letters to soldiers, tied the remaining blankets from the Aidan Project in December, crafted dog toys for the Humane Society and made hats for the Center for the Homeless and local hospitals. Senior Jessica Choi, publicity officer for Notre Dame Circle K, said the Service Extravaganza is a way to spread the word about Circle K. “We hope to expand our membership and show everyone the joys of doing service,” Choi said. The president of Notre Dame Circle K, Alyssa Casill, said approximately 100 students serve in the club each year. The group is part of Circle K International and organizes 12 weekly projects as well as others throughout the semester. “We do pretty much any kind of service you can think of,” Casill said. “[The projects] range from going to Saint Mary’s Convent to the Humane Society.” This semester, Notre Dame Circle K will begin cooking and serving dinner at the South Bend Catholic Worker, a homeless shelter and drop-in center. “The other new project that we’re doing is with Corvilla, which is a home in South Bend for people with disabilities,” Casill said. “That’s going to be more of a monthly project. They have different events for people living in the homes there. In two weeks, they’re doing a snowball softball tournament, so we’re going to go there and help out with that.” Since one of Circle K International’s main tenants is fellowship, Casill said Notre Dame Circle K will host more events that allow members to get to know each other this semester.  “We just want to get as many people involved in as much service as possible,” she said. Sophomore Andy McAsey said he participates in the Logan Center Bowling project through Notre Dame Circle K. “We have fun bowling with people with different disabilities,” McAsey said. Sophomore Caitlin O’Connell said she attended the Service Extravaganza to learn how to become involved in Notre Dame Circle K’s service projects. “I’ve been to the Center for the Homeless one time, and I really liked it,” she said. “And I had a little extra time this semester.” Students interested in becoming involved with Notre Dame Circle K can attend meetings Sundays at 7 p.m. in the Notre Dame Room in LaFortune.last_img read more

January 26

Housing office plans for dorm renovations

first_imgThe University will renovate several residence halls for a variety of reasons this summer, according to Jeff Shoup, director of the Office of Housing. Shoup said for approximately six years the housing office has been gathering data on whether the halls are making optimal use of their space. “We’ve been looking more closely at the halls and how we use their rooms and square footage,” he said. “Our goal has been and continues to be to make sure that, for example, what is a double in Dillon [Hall] is close to a double in Stanford [Hall].” Shoup said his office studies housing applications each year to determine if the residence halls can handle the number of spaces requested. “Sometimes we get a few more students moving off and sometimes a few more staying on,” he said. “It’s kind of fluctuated.” Regardless of the guesswork involved, Shoup said his office does significant research to be fairly confident in predicting how many spaces each residence hall will need the following year. “We look at the number of people we have retained and the anticipated number of first-year students and it’s a bit of an educated guess, but I think it’s pretty educated with all the data I have,” he said. This spring, more women chose to remain on campus for next year than the office had predicted. As a result, some female dorms such as Farley Hall and Cavanaugh Hall are adding beds. “Those were the two that we have added the most beds to,” Shoup said. “Rooms that had been used as triples in past years, we moved back down to doubles in the last couple years. We’re making them back into triples. It happens a little every school year.” Despite this, Shoup said renovations to the residence halls are not all to increase the maximum occupancy of the dorm. Lyons Hall, which will undergo renovations this summer, will decrease its occupancy. The changes include converting student rooms to study spaces and adding a kitchen. “We had used the annex, which is not a great place for rooms, for students’ rooms,” Shoup said. “We’re already working on changing that space.” Lyons rector Megan Brown said the changes to the dorm have been planned for a long time. “Since Lyons’ need for an upgrade was very high, given both the limited amount of public space per hall resident and the condition of public spaces in the hall, Lyons was the perfect candidate for an experiment in hall renovations,” Brown said. Brown said she expects students will be satisfied with the renovations. “The increase in public space in the hall will be a huge benefit to the women in the hall, since the hall currently lacks adequate study and social space compared to most other halls on campus,” she said. Some male dorms will decrease their occupancy next year as well, Shoup said. “Some of the men’s halls are putting some rooms that had been student rooms back to lounges,” he said. “We’re reducing rooms in Stanford [Hall] and Keenan [Hall].” Although several dorms will undergo minor reconfigurations, Shoup said the only major renovations for next year will take place in Lyons Hall. These changes will hopefully provide insight into future renovations for other residence halls, Brown said. “If student satisfaction with the space increases accordingly, we may have found a new model for hall improvement going forward,” she said. Contact Mel Flanagan at mflanag3@nd.edulast_img read more

January 26

CEO alumnus advises on business success

first_imgBill Angrick, a Notre Dame graduate from the class of 1990, spoke as a part of the “Boardroom Insights” lecture series put on by the Mendoza College of Business. Angrick is the CEO of Liquidity Services Inc., a multimillion dollar company that specializes in the buying and selling of excess materials between businesses. The lecture walked the audience through the various stages of growth of Liquidity Services, while also offering valuable pieces of advice on how to build a thriving company. Angrick said in the beginning, his goal was to “provide clients and buying customers the world’s most transparent, innovative, and effective online marketplaces and integrated services for surplus assets … An eBay from business to business.” After raising capital from clients and venture capitalists, the company began to expand into buying and selling products from various sectors, Angrick said. He said he credits this growth to the “network effect.” “More supply leads to more relevant listings for buyers, which leads to more buyers. More buyers leads to more transactions, meaning better results for sellers, thus creating more sellers, which circles back to more supply,” Angrick said. He said the company received its first government contract in 2001- the US Military wanted to use the company to sell its own excess products. The company then went on to win the Defense Logistics Agency Award for Vendor Excellence four times. Liquidity Services Inc. went public in 2006. From there, the company grew at an quickly, its gross revenue booming from $72 million in 2003 to $360 million in 2008, Angrick said. Beginning in 2009, the business moved into acquiring other companies, such as GovDeals and Network International, and taking their markets global. They also expanded into other sectors, which included electronics, consumer packaged goods, biopharmaceutical products, and machinery. This year alone, the gross revenue of Liquidity Services Inc. was $1 billion and was on Forbes’ list of Fastest Growing Tech Companies, Angrick said. Angrick said to run a large company, one needs to have strong convictions of where one is taking the company. He said that a key component to achievement is building great teams: cultivating top talent, bringing new employees into the mission of the company, making everyone feel a part of something, empowering employees to do their job, and making clear what the objective is, not how to achieve the objective. Angrick said one also has to be bold and take risks, and build awareness of their brand. At the end of the lecture Angrick reflected back on how what he had learned in his years at Notre Dame has influenced him throughout life. Angrick said Notre Dame’s emphasis on strong values and faith has helped him immeasurably in his ventures, and the university’s stress on community, teamwork, and excellence will stay with him throughout the rest of his life. “It is your obligation to make your mark,” Angrick said.last_img read more

January 26

Mayor speaks to ND engineers

first_imgIn a lecture Monday morning in DeBartolo Hall, South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg spoke to Notre Dame engineering students about how engineers can help to move the city forward. Buttigieg said a big part of his job centers around bringing South Bend back from its long-dead industrial roots. “I’m the mayor, the mayor of my hometown. I grew up here in South Bend,” Buttigieg said. “What’s great about this job is that you have the ability to shape this community [in many ways], including physically. And engineering is a big part of that.” Although Notre Dame is a major focal point of the city today, Buttigieg said South Bend’s history does not revolve around the University.”South Bend didn’t grow up from education. It grew up from industry, … so it had this industrial phase when the Big Three was actually the Big Four, and the fourth was Studebaker,” he said. “Studebaker closed its doors exactly 50 years ago, actually, exactly this week, [in] 1963, … and what has followed wasn’t exactly post-industrial but what was actually an economically post-traumatic phase. “The week that I entered my mayoral race, actually, there was a headline about South Bend being one of America’s dying cities.” Buttigieg said he is bringing the city back from that phase by utilizing modern technology and using ingenuity to repurpose many of the resources South Bend already has. “The strategy for making South Bend able to find its own way and move forward mostly has to do with a principle expressed in a lot of different ways. That principle is that you take what you have and reimagine its value in a new way,” he said. “For example, this was Ignition Park. It used to be acres and acres of crumbling Studebaker factory infrastructure, … but what we found that had the most demand for that area was an industry that didn’t exist when I was born, and that’s DataAanalytics andDdata support.”  South Bend’s cold weather and abundance of railways that could be repurposed to fit fiber optics make it a great location for the data analytics and data support industry, Buttigieg said.     “As we ask ourselves this question, “What kind of city is South Bend going to be in the next 50 years?” we mark our 150th anniversary this year,” Buttigieg said. “It boils down to a handful of priorities we have to address. One of them is safety, … another is what the economy in downtown looks like,,… and lastly, making sure our government is more efficient, more modern.” After his talk, Buttigiegg answered questions about internship and service opportunities for prospective engineers in his office or for the city of South Bend. Buttigieg told The Observer after the talk that his ultimate vision for South Bend is broad in scope. “The goal we’re driving toward is a city that feels more like a city, a city that has a reputation of being one of America’s greatest university towns, and a city with the benefits of a larger city [and] the benefits of a smaller town,” he said. Contact Alex Cao at acao@nd.edulast_img read more

January 26

‘Dante Now!’ blends poetry, performance

first_imgEmily McConville | The Observer Amidst the many football-related activities of a fall Friday afternoon, the Italian studies program gave visitors and students alike a much different option last Friday.Students in various Italian classes, donning robes, red cloth caps and golden wreaths on their heads, walked around campus in groups and recited excerpts from the Italian poet Dante’s “Divine Comedy” as part of the annual “Dante Now! A Divine Comedy Flashmob.”“[The event is] to try to introduce people to Dante and show them how beautiful it is,” Italian studies research assistant professor Anne Leone said. “In my experience, a lot of people are kind of curious about Dante. It’s a nice way to answer some people’s questions.”According to the William and Katherine Devers Program in Dante Studies website, students read Dante’s work at various public places between 2 and 3 p.m., such as on the steps of Bond Hall, in front of the Library and in front of the main building. At 3 p.m., students, professors, parents of alumni and members of the public performed a choral reading of a section of Dante’s work at the Grotto. The readings were followed by a public talk in the Carey Auditorium in the Library and a reception.“’Dante Now!’ is a way to have more laymen experience the beauty of the ‘Divine Comedy’ because it’s still relevant today,” sophomore Mary Lien said. “The truth imparted in the ‘Divine Comedy’ really is something super relevant to the Catholic tradition on campus, so ‘Dante Now!’ gives people a chance to learn more about Dante, to read Dante in the modern time and be able to experience it firsthand.”Lien said the public nature of the event allows anyone to experience Dante’s works.“You don’t have to look at a poster beforehand, you just hear people on the street reciting Dante and can join in,” she said.Sophomore Greg Jenn said reading the poem aloud introduced people who might never have explored Dante to his poems.“As a group, we’re drawing people in,” Jenn said. “We’re not individuals, we’re inviting people into the community of Dante. It’s supposed to be read in a group.”Many students in Italian classes have been preparing for “Dante Now!” since classes began in August.“We got the piece of paper at the very beginning of the year and we talked about it,” Jenn said. “We’ve spent several class periods going over it, analyzing the text and speaking the Italian to practice.”According to instructor of Italian studies and graduate student Thomas Graff, understanding Dante is as important as being able to recite it.“We go through it in class get the cultural background, answer the questions like ‘Who’s Dante?’” Graff said.In addition, all 208 Italian language students have attended a reading workshop to develop their pronunciation of the text and become familiar with its meaning, Leone said.“We work on the rhythm, intonation, phrasing and pronunciation in those workshops.” she said. “It’s open to the public but it’s usually the classes that have been studying it so all of our language classes come in during their language period on Wednesday.”While participation in the event is part of many students’ classes, anyone can join in, Graff said. Many spectators also picked up the handouts with the text on it and recited the poems alongside the students.“You can get involved even if you aren’t in the class,” Lien said. “We give out these papers for people to join us, to read if they feel comfortable reading Italian. There’s a translation beside the Italian original script so laymen will have no trouble understanding it.”Being fluent in Italian is not necessary to experience Dante’s works, Lien said.“’The ‘Divine Comedy’ is essentially a poem,” she said. “It has that cadence and rhyme to it that you can really hear. You don’t even have to understand the language, you can just hear the beauty of how it sounds in Italian. I think it’s beautiful to anyone.”However, it is possible for those who are interested in Dante’s works to explore their meanings. After the recitations, Albert J. and Helen M. Ravarino Family Director of Dante and Italian Studies and Inaugural Academic Director of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway Theodore Cachey, associate professor of Italian Christian Moevs and Leone gave a public lecture in the library, each discussing a different aspect of Dante’s “Inferno.” According to Graff, Notre Dame makes understanding Dante’s works possible because of its professors.“The Dante professors we have are incredible, some of the best in the nation,” he said.Both Lien and Jenn said they encourage students who are curious about Dante to consider enrolling in a course focused on his works.“In my personal opinion, Dante is probably one of the greatest poets of all time,” Jenn said. “Why would you not want to listen and be exposed to that?”Tags: Dante, Divine Comedy flashmob, Italian Studies, Notre Damelast_img read more

January 26

Saint Mary’s hosts panel on “The Handmaid’s Tale” in anticipation of the Christian Culture Lecture

first_imgTo prepare for the upcoming Christian Culture Lecture, Saint Mary’s hosted a discussion about “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood on Tuesday.Speakers included Phyllis Kaminski of the religious studies and gender and women’s studies departments, Ann Marie Short of the English department and Laura Williamson Ambrose of the humanistic studies department. The three professors reflected on their own interpretations of the novel.Ambrose discussed the novel’s genre. She said she does not believe the novel belongs to science fiction or feminist genres and that Atwood resists labels.Instead, the novel belongs in the speculative fiction genre, Ambrose said. This genre is particularly scary for many readers because it is so realistic, she added.“Speculative fiction says this could maybe happen tomorrow,” Ambrose said. “It’s more frightening and provocative than science fiction and a distant galaxy, far, far away. … Speculative fiction makes the work of ignoring a little bit harder.”Kaminski first read the novel as a doctoral student in Canada. She said she thinks Atwood’s Canadian nationality has a large influence on the novel, and helps Atwood look at the United States with a critical eye.“Atwood set this [novel] in the United States from the perspective of someone part of a country that was considered lesser than, or other than,” she said. “She sees what happens when we’re superficial and don’t try to move beyond ignorance and ignoring. That’s a real blind spot in the United States. She’s standing north of the border when she thinks and writes, and she sees the differences [between the U.S. and Canada].”Short said she also thinks Atwood’s Canadian influence impacted how race is presented in the novel. In “The Handmaid’s Tale,” the race of each character is not mentioned.“The novel is not explicit about race, but it’s clearly a racist society,” Short said. “Is it so obvious that an American world would be racist? It’s not even worth being explicit. It’s a given.”Short spoke about her experiences reading the novel. She said she has read it three times, and her first time reading it was in the ’90s at age 16.She said at that time, it was not very relatable and felt like science fiction. However, when Hulu announced the television series based on the book, Short returned to the novel. She then read it again to prepare to teach it this semester.Short said the subject of race in the novel stood out to her, during her second and third times reading the book. In the novel, there are elements of a racist society, Short said. The housekeepers are described as dark skinned, and there is anti-semitic rhetoric in Gilead, for instance. “It is very clear that Gilead is racist, white supremacist society, but it never says that explicitly,” she said.The Hulu series practices color-blind casting, Short said, and casts black actors into roles that would probably be white characters in the novel. She said this conveys the message that everyone’s experience is the same in Gilead, regardless of race.This portrayal of the novel and race is problematic, Short said.“It erases the issue of racism and says we are in a post-racial society,” she said.Short questioned how new generations will interpret “The Handmaid’s Tale” as they watch the Hulu series instead of reading the book.“In this moment of Hulu and the questions and critiques of race, what is our responsibility with this novel now?” she said. “In the show, something felt off, and I realized it was the issue of race. How will people who only watch the Hulu series interpret the story?”Tags: literature, race, the handmaid’s talelast_img read more

January 26

University establishes new Office of Military and Veteran Affairs

first_imgThe University announced the establishment of an Office of Military and Veteran Affairs (OMVA) in a press release Wednesday. According to the release, the office will expand the University’s support for Notre Dame-enrolled veterans and their families, active-duty and ROTC students and those who are dependents of service members.The office will be led by Regan Jones, who, according to the OMVA’s website, is a United States Marine Corps veteran who came to Notre Dame in 2014. Jones said he was hired as the director of the OMVA in September, and since then has accomplished “a lot of work” through collaboration with various resources, offices and departments at the University.“The creation of this office is really special because I’m in a position to help foster sort of this connective tissue amongst pockets of excellence to create an ecosystem and ensure that these [military-connected] students have a robust Notre Dame experience,” Jones said.Provost Thomas G. Burish said in the press release that the Military and Veteran Initiative Steering Committee, an organization Jones said he was involved with for 10 months before the OMVA’s establishment, led the initiative to create the new office.“With this new [OMVA], we will further strengthen our commitment to serving those who have given so much to our nation and the University,” Burish said in the press release.According to the release, the new office will focus on growing the military-connected undergraduate and graduate student populations and developing targeted services to meet their unique needs. Jones said his immediate goals for the office are centered on “infrastructure and capacity.”“An important first step includes things that may not seem very exciting: how do we tag and track these types of [military-connected] students on campus, what’s the success rate and what programs are they interested in,” Jones said. “That’ll tell us a little bit about not only how to support the students we have but how to attract more.”Jones said the OMVA will also expand existing programs such as The Warriors Scholar Project, a program designed to help service members pivot from the battlefield to the classroom, and the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC), among others. As an example, Jones said, the OMVA is working with the enrollment division to further support ROTC students through financial aid for room and board.“We’re going to leverage all of the available resources and work with different stakeholders depending on what program we’re talking about,” Jones said. “So looking with the enrollment division and our deans to think about how we can structure not only our financial aid, but also more development and recruitment strategies to attract [military-connected students] for undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees.”Jones said when he considers the community aspect of the OMVA, he believes it is important to both integrate the students into the campus community and ensure that they have a network they can meet and connect with in a “really deep and meaningful way.”“Being someone from the military [with a] military background, I put myself in the minds of these students,” Jones said. “They’ve done incredibly brave things, [such as going] overseas in combat, but they’re terrified about their next act and what life looks like after service. I feel fortunate to be able to help create a bridge for them from service to their next act and ensure that they’re successful, that they have a robust Notre Dame experience and that they go out and graduate and become a force for good so it’s super exciting.”The announcement comes during a special time, Jones said, in terms of the backdrop of the football game between Navy and Notre Dame to take place this Saturday.“It’s really special, that historical relationship [Notre Dame has] with the U.S. military in general, but more specifically, the U.S. Navy and that rich, deep history in relationship with Navy that really kind of saved the University back in the 1940’s,” Jones said.According to the OMVA website, during World War II more than two-thirds of the Notre Dame student body enlisted in the military, placing the University in “dire financial straits.” However, after the creation of a Navy program through which 12,000 officers were trained on campus and the University was financially “kept afloat,” former University president Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh promised to play the Naval Academy in football every year.“The bonds between Notre Dame and the U.S. military predate the American Civil War and have grown stronger over many years, as successive generations of Notre Dame graduates and Holy Cross priests have served our nation in times of war and peace,” Burish said.Laura Carlson, vice president and associate provost and chair of the Military and Veteran Initiative Steering Committee, said in the release that she believes Notre Dame can achieve singular distinction as one of the nation’s “best universities for veterans, military, ROTC and their families.”“In Regan Jones, a highly decorated Marine Corps veteran who has spent the past three-plus years getting to know the University from a variety of perspectives, we have the ideal leader to direct us in this endeavor,” Carlson said in the release.Tags: Military, Office of Military and Veteran Affairs, ROTC, Veteranslast_img read more

January 26

Saint Mary’s program connects older, younger students in “sisterhood” bond

first_imgMany Saint Mary’s first-years approached Le Mans Green on Reveal Day Sunday afternoon to find juniors holding up signs, each brightly decorated with the name of a different first year. While Saint Mary’s may not have Greek life, the Big Belle Little Belle program enables students to foster similar bonds between students.Students gathered to celebrate the reveal of their match for the upcoming year. “We walked out of Le Mans, and all of the Big Belles had big signs with our names on them,” first year Lea Hall, a participant in the program, said. “I found my big, Abby, holding my name and as I walked up she handed me a little present. We then did a scavenger hunt and it was just a fun time.”The Big Belle Little Belle program connects juniors and first-years based on a number of factors. Committee co-chair junior Moira LeMay said in an email the club based their matching off both an event and questionnaire responses. “We had a social event that allowed the juniors and first-years to talk to each other so that everyone had a sense of knowing at least someone in the program,” LeMay said. “Then, we sent out a questionnaire to the members to further the pairing process.” While both factors weighed into matching decisions, LeMay said the committee placed a larger emphasis on the results of the social events. Following the event, everyone received a half-sheet to record their thoughts. “When it came time to put two-and-two together, we catered toward the littles’ preferences,” LeMay said. “If they didn’t have a preference, then we went with who seemed to be a good fit for what the little had answered on the questionnaire.”A social event leading up to the pairing process was a change from the previous year, LeMay said. While in the past students were matched solely off questionnaire answers, the event allowed students to get a sense of preferences prior to being paired. “This year we incorporated an event prior to Reveal Day,” LeMay said. “That way, the committee had a better sense of who would be good matches together. We also brought in catering to give the new pairs something to do besides meet and leave.” LeMay said Sunday’s reveal acted as a positive indicator for the year to come. “The committee overall was impressed with the turnout and participation from the club members,” LeMay said. “It met all expectations, and provided us a good gauge of how the year will follow.”The program’s goals for the year are to promote a relationship of reciprocal growth, LeMay said.“I look forward to seeing how these mentorships grow into friendships,” she said. “As a committee, we hope that our matches will learn from one another,” LeMay said. Hall said she looks forward to the community and sisterhood to be gained through her participation in Big Belle Little Belle. “As a freshman, even though I have sophomores, juniors and seniors in my classes, I don’t get to really focus on a friendship with people other than freshman,” Hall said. “I would have rushed for a sorority this year, but Saint Mary’s doesn’t have this opportunity because there are only girls. I love the sorority feel and closeness of the girls in this club.” Tags: Big Belle Little Belle, reveal day, Sisterhoodlast_img read more

January 26

Saint Mary’s community hosts Madrigal dinner

first_imgCourtesy of Mary Firtl Saint Mary’s students perform in the annual Madrigals production.Though the event is entertaining, it also serves the higher purpose of fundraising.“The proceeds from the events actually goes to the women’s choir to help fund their women’s choir tour that they do every other year,” Baxter said.All of the departments’ work hard to benefit the women’s choir.“The women’s choir starts working in September. They start rehearsing the pieces, and then we start working from October on,” Baxter said.The Saint Mary’s event differs from other versions of Madrigal dinners.“It’s a really unusual and unique kind of event,” Baxter said.Baxter said that Saint Mary’s communications professor Susan Baxter has developed two scripts for the dinner after Nancy Menk said “that she wanted the performance to be a little more reverent.”Before Susan Baxter’s scripts, the storytelling for the event was secondary, Richard Baxter said.“Over the years [Madrigals] has involved into a presentation that is centered on a story and then it has songs that the choir signs and the choir kind of moves the action along,” he said.The scripts follow one traditional family living in Renaissance England.“Susan wrote the first script where the daughter falls in love with one of the kitchen people, and of course there is an issue with their social status, and the master of the house did not want them to be married, but eventually, they are married in secret. That’s part A,” Richard Baxter said. “Part B is what we are doing now, where the daughter and the husband have moved away and you see the master and the mistress and the jester coping with the master’s dip in faith.”In the past, the love story was performed, but this year, the play being performed is the one after the daughter and husband move away.Like all Christmas stories, Baxter said it has a happy ending.“The story she has put in is really a story of faith, and how he recovers his faith and how the Christmas message is rediscovered and enjoyed,” he said.Though the story has become an important part of the dinner, there are still many other features.“The evening involves a lot of sacred music,” Baxter said. “They have a trumpet fanfare, and they have jugglers. That is all part of the festivity with the intent being that you are in a medieval hall prior to Christmas time. … The dance department puts on the dances, and the ancient music ensemble from Anderson University comes down and plays the music.”All of the work that goes into the production pays off with the reaction and dedication of the audience.“There is a family that has been coming every year for the last four years, and they bring their children,” Baxter said. “They pulled me aside two years ago, and they said, ‘As far as we are concerned, Christmas doesn’t begin until we come to this event.’”Baxter said he enjoys watching people come to the event.“Watching people come in out of the cold, hang their coats up, sit down and be transported back to the middle ages. That’s my favorite part,” he said.Tags: christmas, Christmas Madrigal, Madrigal Dinner Every late November, the lobby of Regina North is transformed back in time. People from departments across campus including the costume shop, the dance department, dining services, the set shop, the music department and the Office of Campus and Community events join together to create a night of music, magic and storytelling through the Madrigal dinner.Attendees are transported back in time to the Renaissance period for a night of dancing signing and holiday cheer.“This office has always helped to do the logistics of the event in addition to selling the tickets and managing how the event operates,” Richard Baxter, the director of campus and community events, said.last_img read more

January 26

Notre Dame cancels Washington program after housing closes

first_imgThe University announced Tuesday it is asking students in the Notre Dame Washington Program in D.C. to return to their homes.The decision comes after the University of California decided to close its Washington Center, where Notre Dame students live during their time in the capital.There are 21 reported cases of the coronavirus in the D.C. region, according to The Washington Post.So far, Notre Dame has also recalled all students from its abroad programs in Italy, China and the Jerusalem Global Gateway. Three students studying at Nanzan University in Nagoya, Japan, were also brought home.All University updates regarding coronavirus can be found at https://coronavirus.nd.edu/.Tags: coronavirus, Washington Programlast_img read more